Courses

Math 152: Syllabus - Spring 2020

The following table gives the Spring 2020 grading scheme:

ComponentWeight of Component
Quizzes 10 percent
Workshops 8 percent
SaplingPlus Homework 7 percent
Midterm 1 15 percent
Midterm 2 15 percent
Midterm 3 15 percent
Final Exam 30 percent
Total 100 percent

The next three paragraphs tell you how the course grade is determined

At the end of the course each student will have a total course score. This total course score is the sum of the student performances on the seven assignment groups. These assignment groups are the final exam, the first midterm exam, the second midterm exam, the third midterm exam, the quizzes, the workshop writeups and the SaplingPlus homework. The weight of each assignment group is the following: The final exam counts for 30 percent of the total course score, each midterm exam counts for 15 percent of the total course score, the quizzes count for 10 percent of the total course score, the workshop writeups count for 8 percent of the total course score, and SaplingPlus homework counts for 7 percent of the total course score. The significance of the total course score and the relevance of homework and workshops are described in the next two paragraphs.

After the final exam is graded, the Math Department determines what score on the final exam is an A, what score is a B+, what score is a B, all the way down through all of the grades. This determination is based both on how well students have mastered the required material and on the difficulty of the final exam. Each lecturer is then directed to count how many students in that lecturer's sections received final exam grades of A, B+, B, etc. These numbers determine the total numbers of A’s, B+’s, B’s, etc that the lecturer gives as course grades to that lecturer's students. A student’s letter grade on the final exam is not necessarily their letter grade in the course. In order to assign grades to particular students, each instructor sorts all of the students, from highest to lowest, based on the students’ total course score. The lecturer then starts at the top of the list, counts off the number of each grade allocated to the class according to final exam scores, and assigns the grades in descending order. For example, suppose that 10 students get A’s on the final exam, and 5 students get B+’s. Then the students with the 10 highest total course scores will get A’s, and the students with the next 5 highest total course scores will get B+’s. The instructor proceeds down the list, assigning the total number of allocated B’s, C+’s, C’s, D’s, and F’s, until each student has a grade. Thus, a student’s course grade is sometimes not the same as their final exam grade. The reason why this system is fair is that everyone enrolled in Math 152 across the university takes an equivalent version of the same final exam, so counting how many of each grade was earned on the final exam by a particular section is an accurate way of measuring how well that section mastered the required material. This way, a grade of A in Math 152 corresponds to the same level of mastery, independent of the professor, recitation, and difficulty level of the midterm exams and quizzes. Please note that this method of assigning grades means that a student’s rank in the class is essentially a meaningless statistic. A student ranked, say 33 out of 75, is no more or less entitled to an A than a student ranked 1 out of 75 or 56 out of 75. The number of A’s for the class is determined by the class’s performance on the final exam. Thus, being at a certain rank or higher does not guarantee a particular letter grade. Letter grades are determined by the method described above.

Graded homework assignments exist primarily to give students feedback on their ability to calculate correct answers at an early stage of the learning process. They are not intended to measure a student's mastery of the material. Likewise, the workshop writeups are designed to give the students feedback on their thought process at an early stage of the learning curve. Only the midterm exams and the final exam measure mastery of the course material, and without doing well on these, it is impossible to pass the course, even with a perfect score on the homework and workshops. Make sure you take full advantage of the homework and workshops to get as much feedback as possible on your problem solving and your thought processes. If you can solve SaplingPlus and workshop problems without help, then your efforts will show up in your exam scores, and these will largely determine your grade.

The following table gives the Spring 2020 course schedule:

UnitLectureBook Section(s)Topic(s)Suggested Exercises in the Book
1 1 5.7, 6.1 Review of the Substitution Method (including the indefinite integral of sec) and Area between two Curves 5.7: 15, 19, 22, 23, 25, 27, 28, 31, 33, 35, 43, 44, 49, 52, 55, 56, 59, 60, 69, 70
6.1: 4, 9, 12, 17, 18, 21, 23, 25
1 2 6.2 Applications of Integration: Volumes of Solids with known Cross-Sections, Density, Average Value 6.2: 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 15, 25, 26, 40, 42, 44, 46, 50
1 3 6.3 Finding Volumes of Solids of Revolution using Disks and Washers 6.3: 7, 10, 14, 19, 21, 24, 32, 33, 34
1 4 6.4 Finding Volumes of Solids of Revolution using Cylindrical Shells 6.4: 8, 10, 19, 22, 27, 31, 35, 39, 40
1 5 7.1 Integration by Parts 7.1: 6, 10, 14, 22, 23, 26, 39, 52, 57, 58, 62, 64, 67, 82
1 6 7.2 Trigonometric Integrals 7.2: 1, 2, 3, 12, 30, 33, 36, 47, 53, 60, 67, 68, 71
Also: know how to find the antiderivative (indefinite integral) of sec cubed
1 7 Exam 1 Exam 1 given during usual lecture time and location  
2 8 7.3 Trigonometric Substitution 7.3: 5, 6, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17, 22, 26, 29, 36, 37, 42, 45
2 9 7.5 Psrtial Fractions 7.5: 4, 8, 12, 14, 17, 20, 33, 34, 41
2 10 7.6 Stategies for Integration 7.6: 12, 13, 21, 22, 25, 30, 31, 34, 37, 40, 42, 45, 50, 56, 59
2 11 7.7 Improper Integrals 7.7: 8, 11, 12, 16, 23, 29, 35, 36, 37, 41, 44, 53, 54, 57, 59, 67, 68, 71, 73
2   7.8* Numerical Integration - This topic will be covered in a workshop 7.8: 5, 10, 18, 20, 41, 42, 43, 44, 46, 49, 55
2 12 8.2 Arc Length and Surface Area 8.2: 3, 4, 7, 9, 10, 19, 29, 31, 38, 42, 44, 46
2 13 Exam 2 Exam 2 given during usual lecture time and location  
3 14 10.1 Sequences 10.1: 14, 18, 23, 26, 29, 32, 47, 48, 56, 57
3 15 10.2 Infinite Series and Summing an Infinite Series 10.2: 4, 6, 8, 11, 12, 14, 17, 20, 21, 24, 28, 29, 32, 33, 40, 42
3 16 10.3 Convergence of a Positive-Term Series 10.3: 4, 5, 9, 10, 11, 15, 16, 18, 22, 23, 25, 35, 37, 40, 41, 50, 51, 53, 58, 60, 67
3/td> 17 10.4 Absolute and Conditional Convergence 10.4: 3, 8, 10, 13, 21, 22, 23, 24, 28
3 18 10.5 The Ratio and Root Tests and Strategies for Choosing Tests 10.5: 4, 7, 11, 14, 15, 22, 24, 25, 27, 38, 39, 47, 52, 59
3 19 10.6 Power Series 10.6: 9, 10, 14, 16, 19, 25, 26, 30, 31, 38, 39, 49
3 20 10.7 Taylor Polynomials 10.7: 4, 10, 19, 21, 25, 28, 37, 38, 43, 51, 52
3 21 Exam 3 Exam 3 given during usual lecture time and location  
4 22 10.8 Taylor Series 10.8: 4, 12, 18, 20, 21, 32, 33, 34, 41, 43, 44, 50, 55, 56
4 23 11.1 Parametric Equations 11.1: 8, 9, 12, 14, 18, 20, 21, 22
4 24 11.2 Arc Length and Speed 11.2: 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 21, 22
4 25 11.3 Polar Coordinates 11.3: 3, 5, 6, 11, 12, 14, 18, 22, 29, 30
4 26 11.4 Area and Arc Length in Polar Coordinates 11.4: 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 16, 27, 29, 32
4 27 2.1-2.5 Complex Numbers All problems in packet
4 28 2.1-2.5 Complex Numbers and Review All problems in packet

Students are expected to be familiar with all of the described policies and procedures. Additional information may be posted during the semester.

This page contains general syllabus information. Individual lecturers will provide their own details.

Prerequisite:

Math 135, Math 151, or equivalent.

Required Textbook:

Rogawski, et al., Calculus (Early Transcendentals), 4th edition, with Sapling Plus access. (Note that if you have previously taken Math 151 or 152 and purchased the 3rd edition with WebAssign access, you do not need to purchase a new textbook.) Please see the Math Department Master Textbook List for details on what to purchase.

Other Required Resources:

You will need to obtain access to Sapling Plus for online homework assignments. If you purchase the 4th edition of Rogawski from the Rutgers bookstore, your textbook will come with Sapling access. If you have previously taken Math 151 or 152 and purchased the 3rd edition of Rogawski with WebAssign access when you took either of those courses, then you will be given access to Sapling Plus and do not need to purchase additional access.

Use of Calculators:

A graphing calculator, such as the TI-84, may be helpful to you during workshops and while doing homework assignments, but use of calculators will not be permitted on any quiz or test. If you do not have a graphing calculator, there are free online tools, such as Desmos (https://www.desmos.com/calculator), that can provide the functionality that you will need.

Learning goals:

To understand the fundamentals integral calculus and its applications, the theory of infinite series and power series, parametric curves, polar coordinates, and complex numbers. The successful student should be able to solve problems similar to those on the official list of homework problems, those assigned in Sapling Plus, and those demonstrated in other parts of the course.

SAS Core Curriculum learning goals:

  • QQ: Formulate, evaluate, and communicate conclusions and inferences from quantitative information.
  • QR: Apply effective and efficient mathematical or other formal processes to reason and to solve problems.

How grades were assigned in Fall 2019:

Your course grade at the end of the Fall 2019 term was based on the following components:

Exam 1   19%
Exam 2  19%
Final Exam   38%
Quizzes  9%
Workshops  8%
Sapling  7%
Total  100%

How letter grades were calculated in Fall 2019 in Math 152:

The exact method that was used to determine your course letter grade at the end of the Fall 2019 term can be found here.

The date of the Fall 2019 Final Exam:

The Final Exam was given on Monday, December 16, 4:00-7:00pm. The location of your exam was announced by your lecturer.

Midterm Exams:

In addition to the final exam, there were two midterm exams in Fall 2019. These exams were at the same place and time as the lecture. Your lecturer announced the exact dates of the midterm exams.

Sapling Plus Access:

Go to saplinglearning.com/login.

Canvas Access:

Go to canvas.rutgers.edu.

Attendance Policy:

This class moves through material fast, so attendance is expected at every class period unless unavoidable due to illness, funeral, court appearance, other legitimate emergency. See the Rutgers University attendance policy at http://policies.rutgers.edu/1027-currentpdf.

Academic Integrity:

All Rutgers students are expected to be familiar with and abide by the academic integrity policy (http://academicintegrity.rutgers.edu/academic-integrity-policy). Violations of the policy are taken very seriously.

Some services that may be of use:

Counseling, ADAP & Psychiatric Services (CAPS)

(848) 932-7884 / 17 Senior Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08901/ http://health.rutgers.edu/medical-counseling-services/counseling/

CAPS is a University mental health support service that includes counseling, alcohol and other drug assistance, and psychiatric services staffed by a team of professional within Rutgers Health services to support students’ efforts to succeed at Rutgers University. CAPS offers a variety of services that include: individual therapy, group therapy and workshops, crisis intervention, referral to specialists in the community and consultation and collaboration with campus partners.

Violence Prevention & Victim Assistance (VPVA)

(848) 932-1181 / 3 Bartlett Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 / www.vpva.rutgers.edu/

The Office for Violence Prevention and Victim Assistance provides confidential crisis intervention, counseling and advocacy for victims of sexual and relationship violence and stalking to students, staff and faculty.  To reach staff during office hours when the university is open or to reach an advocate after hours, call 848-932-1181.

Disability Services

 (848) 445-6800 / Lucy Stone Hall, Suite A145, Livingston Campus, 54 Joyce Kilmer Avenue, Piscataway, NJ 08854 /  https://ods.rutgers.edu/

Rutgers University welcomes students with disabilities into all of the University's educational programs. In order to receive consideration for reasonable accommodations, a student with a disability must contact the appropriate disability services office at the campus where you are officially enrolled, participate in an intake interview, and provide documentation: https://ods.rutgers.edu/students/documentation-guidelines. If the documentation supports your request for reasonable accommodations, your campus’s disability services office will provide you with a Letter of Accommodations. Please share this letter with your instructors and discuss the accommodations with them as early in your courses as possible. To begin this process, please complete the Registration form on the ODS web site at: https://ods.rutgers.edu/students/registration-form.

Scarlet Listeners

(732) 247-5555 / https://rutgers.campuslabs.com/engage/organization/scarletlisteners

Free and confidential peer counseling and referral hotline, providing a comforting and supportive safe space.

Report a Concern:  http://health.rutgers.edu/do-something-to-help/

Disclaimer: Posted for informational purposes only

This material is posted by the faculty of the Mathematics Department at Rutgers New Brunswick for informational purposes. While we try to maintain it, information may not be current or may not apply to individual sections. The authority for content, textbook, syllabus, and grading policy lies with the current instructor.

Information posted prior to the beginning of the semester is frequently tentative, or based on previous semesters. Textbooks should not be purchased until confirmed with the instructor. For generally reliable textbook information—with the exception of sections with an alphabetic code like H1 or T1, and topics courses (197,395,495)—see the textbook list.