Mathematics Department - Graduate Pizza Seminar - Spring 2017

Graduate Pizza Seminar - Spring 2017



Organizer(s)

Emily Kukura, Justin Semonsen

Archive

Website

http://www.math.rutgers.edu/~js2118/pizza/index.html



Upcoming Talks


Friday, March 3rd

Emily Kukura, Rutgers University

"TBD"

Time: 1:40 PM
Location: Hill Grad Student Lounge





Past Talks


Friday, February 24th

Corrine Yap, Rutgers University

" Origametry"

Time: 1:40 PM
Location: Hill Grad Student Lounge
Abstract: The art of paper-folding extends far beyond paper cranes; indeed, working with "infinite" paper allows us to analyze crease patterns as line configurations and gives us tools to tackle classical geometric constructions. We will work out some of these constructions and find out if origami is more powerful than our old friends, the straightedge and compass (spoiler: it is). For those who want to get their hands dirty, finite paper will be provided.


Friday, February 17th

Matt Charnley, Rutgers University (ACTUAL START TIME WAS 1:40PM)

"Why you should never get your bird drunk, and other random facts"

Time: 2:40 PM
Location: Hill Grad Student Lounge
Abstract: No, we aren't actually going to be getting people or animals drunk, but we are going to be talking about Random Walks and Brownian Motion. We'll start with random walks on the integers, talk about some properties, and use that to motivate the definition of Brownian Motion on the real numbers. And don't worry, this will all come back to PDEs eventually.


Friday, February 17th

Matt Charnley, Rutgers University

"TBA"

Time: 1:40 PM
Location: Hill Grad Student Lounge


Friday, February 10th

John Chiarelli, Rutgers University

"This Computer Does and Does Not Work: Using Quantum Mechanics in Computing Systems"

Time: 1:40 PM
Location: Hill Grad Student Lounge
Abstract: While the mathematics behind quantum mechanics has been known for close to a century, it is only within the last 35 years that researchers have started asking its phenomena could be used in efficient computation of difficult problems. In this talk, I will go over some of the known algorithms that use quantum mechanics to solve otherwise time-consuming problems quickly, as well as some of the historical background behind them. Viewers can expect to leave with a full understanding of quantum computation - provided that they adjust their use of the term "understand."


Friday, February 3rd

Yonah Biers-Ariel, Rutgers University

"Signal Processing and Filtering"

Time: 1:40 PM
Location: Hill Grad Student Lounge
Abstract: I thought that my car insurance premiums were too high. I made a simple model to show AAA that they were charging too much. Now I still pay too much, but I also have a captive audience to complain to.


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