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Graduate Courses Taken by Undergraduates

Undergraduate Proficiency Examinations

The Mathematics Department offers proficiency examinations for selected courses. Depending on the course, and their performance on the exam, students may earn one of two types of proficiency pass:

  • Full-Credit proficiency. A student earning full-credit proficiency for a course gets credit for the course as though he/she took and passed the course. The course will appear on the students university transcript with a designation such as to "By examination". The student will also receive any credits towards graduation that are normally provided for passing the course.
  • Mathematics Department internal proficiency. A student earning internal proficiency for a course (referred to below as course X) is considered to have passed the course for the following purposes:
    • If course X is a requirement for the math major or math minor, then that requirement is considered to have been satisfied.
    • If course X is a prerequisite for another math department course (referred to below as course Y) then that prerequisite is considered to be satisfied. To register for course Y, a student who has proficiency credit for X (and has satisfied all other prerequisites for course Y) will be given a prerequisite override from the undergraduate office. (In the case that the course Y is offered by another department, the student will need a prerequisite override from the department offering course Y. A student who has received internal proficiency for course X, may request that the math advisor contact the offering department informing the department offering course Y that the student has passed a proficiency exam for course X. The offering department has the final decision whether they will accept that as satisfying the prerequisite for course Y.)
    Course X will not appear on the student's transcript and will not earn credits toward graduation.

Full-credit proficiency exams

Full-credit proficiency exams are offered for courses 115,135, 151 and 152. To take an official proficiency exam the student should contact the office of the academic dean of their school to get prior approval, and to find out the rules for getting proficiency credit. This normally involves paying a fee to the registrar prior to taking the exam. Once this approval is obtained and the fee is paid, the student should bring the receipt from the registrar to the Math undergraduate office (Hill 303) to arrange a time to take the exam. Students receiving at least a grade of B on the proficiency exam will receive full credit for the course. It will appear on the transcript as ``by examination''. A student getting a C on the proficiency exam will not receive full credit for the course, but will be granted Mathematics Department internal proficiency as described above.

Mathematics Department internal proficiency exams

The department offers internal proficiency exam for courses 025 and 026, and also for course 250. Internal proficiency exams are occasionally offered for other courses in unusual situations. To take the internal proficiency exam for 025 or 026, contact the math undergraduate office (ugoffice@math.rutgers.edu) The internal proficiency exam for 250 is offered to students who have completed the honors calculus course 291, or to other students with the approval of the math advisor or the honors committee chair (who will notify the undergraduate office of the approval). Once this approval is obtained, the student should schedule the exam through the math undergraduate office. The proficiency test for 250 may be waived for students with a grade of A in Math 291.

Evaluation of internal proficiency exams

  • Course 025. A student receiving a grade of at least C will be allowed to register for 026.
  • Course 026. A student receiving a grade of C will be allowed to register for 111 (Precalculus I). A student receiving a grade of B or higher will be allowed to register for 115 (Precalculus)
  • Course 250. Proficiency credit for 250 requires a grade of at least B on the exam.

Restrictions

  • A student must have the required prerequisites for the course in which the proficiency exam is to be taken.
  • A proficiency exam may not be taken in a course in which a student has previously enrolled and received a grade.
  • A proficiency exam may not be taken in a course for which a student is currently registered (at Rutgers New Brunswick) and for which classes have started.
  • A student may take a proficiency exam in a given course only once. 

Dates

Proficiency exams are offered at fixed times each week throughout the year (except near the beginning or end of a semester). A student may arrange to take the exam by contacting the Mathematics Undergraduate office, ugoffice@math.rutgers.edu The student should allow one to two weeks for scheduling the exam.

Undergraduate Proficiency Examinations

The Mathematics Department offers proficiency examinations for selected courses. Depending on the course, and their performance on the exam, students may earn one of two types of proficiency pass:

  • Full-Credit proficiency. A student earning full-credit proficiency for a course gets credit for the course as though he/she took and passed the course. The course will appear on the students university transcript with a designation such as to "By examination". The student will also receive any credits towards graduation that are normally provided for passing the course.
  • Mathematics Department internal proficiency. A student earning internal proficiency for a course (referred to below as course X) is considered to have passed the course for the following purposes:
    • If course X is a requirement for the math major or math minor, then that requirement is considered to have been satisfied.
    • If course X is a prerequisite for another math department course (referred to below as course Y) then that prerequisite is considered to be satisfied. To register for course Y, a student who has proficiency credit for X (and has satisfied all other prerequisites for course Y) will be given a prerequisite override from the undergraduate office. (In the case that the course Y is offered by another department, the student will need a prerequisite override from the department offering course Y. A student who has received internal proficiency for course X, may request that the math advisor contact the offering department informing the department offering course Y that the student has passed a proficiency exam for course X. The offering department has the final decision whether they will accept that as satisfying the prerequisite for course Y.)
    Course X will not appear on the student's transcript and will not earn credits toward graduation.

Full-credit proficiency exams

Full-credit proficiency exams are offered for courses 115,135, 151 and 152. To take an official proficiency exam the student should contact the office of the academic dean of their school to get prior approval, and to find out the rules for getting proficiency credit. This normally involves paying a fee to the registrar prior to taking the exam. Once this approval is obtained and the fee is paid, the student should bring the receipt from the registrar to the Math undergraduate office (Hill 303) to arrange a time to take the exam. Students receiving at least a grade of B on the proficiency exam will receive full credit for the course. It will appear on the transcript as ``by examination''. A student getting a C on the proficiency exam will not receive full credit for the course, but will be granted Mathematics Department internal proficiency as described above.

Mathematics Department internal proficiency exams

The department offers internal proficiency exam for courses 025 and 026, and also for course 250. Internal proficiency exams are occasionally offered for other courses in unusual situations. To take the internal proficiency exam for 025 or 026, contact the math undergraduate office (ugoffice@math.rutgers.edu) The internal proficiency exam for 250 is offered to students who have completed the honors calculus course 291, or to other students with the approval of the math advisor or the honors committee chair (who will notify the undergraduate office of the approval). Once this approval is obtained, the student should schedule the exam through the math undergraduate office. The proficiency test for 250 may be waived for students with a grade of A in Math 291.

Evaluation of internal proficiency exams

  • Course 025. A student receiving a grade of at least C will be allowed to register for 026.
  • Course 026. A student receiving a grade of C will be allowed to register for 111 (Precalculus I). A student receiving a grade of B or higher will be allowed to register for 115 (Precalculus)
  • Course 250. Proficiency credit for 250 requires a grade of at least B on the exam.

Restrictions

  • A student must have the required prerequisites for the course in which the proficiency exam is to be taken.
  • A proficiency exam may not be taken in a course in which a student has previously enrolled and received a grade.
  • A proficiency exam may not be taken in a course for which a student is currently registered (at Rutgers New Brunswick) and for which classes have started.
  • A student may take a proficiency exam in a given course only once. 

Dates

Proficiency exams are offered at fixed times each week throughout the year (except near the beginning or end of a semester). A student may arrange to take the exam by contacting the Mathematics Undergraduate office, ugoffice@math.rutgers.edu The student should allow one to two weeks for scheduling the exam.

This page describes programs sponsored by the Department of Mathematics for pre-college students with a strong interest in mathematics and provides links to other programs. 

Students interested in applying for admission to Rutgers University should consult our page for Prospective Students.

Rutgers Young Scholars Program in Discrete Mathematics is a four-week summer residential program at Rutgers designed to provide mathematically talented high school students with an exciting experience and ultimately to encourage them to consider careers in the mathematical sciences. 

 

Further Information

The Governor's School of New Jersey in the Sciences is a summer program for high school seniors that takes place at Rutgers.  The component called the Governor's School in Engineering and Technology takes place at Rutgers.

American Mathematical Society (AMS) maintains a list of nationwide Summer Programs, Math Clubs, Magazines, Careers, and Competitions.

Mathematical Outreach for K-12 Teachers

Math for Teachers is an outreach program of the Department of Mathematics at Rutgers University that provides exte nded coursework to consider the mathematics you teach. As the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics (CCSSM) are implemented, you will be asked to bring students to proficiency in "mathematical practices" such as:

  • Making math make sense
  • Explaining and justifying mathematical work
  • Strategically employing mathematical reasoning
  • Organizing computational procedures

Centered at the New Brunswick campus of Rutgers University, Math for Teachers draws on the strengths of a faculty dedicated to the art of teaching and who have made major scholarly contributions to the field.

Read more: Programs for Teachers of Mathematics

Mathematics Graduate Program

Most Recent Graduates


Information about past Rutgers MSc. recipients can be found here.

Pre-history: Rutgers created a postgraduate study program in 1870, in order to award a certificate to people who took an extra undergraduate course after graduation. Graduate courses formally appeared in 1876. While taking such courses, graduate students were often appointed as a "Tutor in Mathematics"; this was the forerunner of the modern Teaching Assistant. About 10 people received a Masters degree in Mathematics during the era 1870-1906. When the Mathematics department was formally organized in 1906, it stopped admitting graduate students.

The first MSc degrees in Mathematics were awarded to James Barton (BSc 1871; Tutor 1873-74; MSc 1874) and Albert S. Cook (BSc 1872; Tutor 1872-73; MSc 1875). Other masters degrees were awarded to men who went on to become professors at Rutgers: Alfred Titsworth (MSc 1880); Robert Prentiss (MSc 1881); William Breazeale (MSc 1895); and Richard Morris (MSc 1902). The Mathematics Department had other graduate students of this type in the 1890's including: DeWitt, Scattergood (MSc 1997), VanDyck Jr. (AM 1899).

In 1929, a new Masters degree in Mathematics was created, requiring 8 courses and a written thesis. The first such degree was awarded in 1930 to Charles Eason. The first woman to receive a M.Sc. degree in Math was Eveline Stevens in 1934 (NJC '32). Professors Brasefield and Starke were the advisors for most of these students; their Masters theses may be inspected in Rutgers' Math Library. There were 9 MSc degrees granted during the 1930's, and 50 MSc degrees granted during 1940-1959.

The modern era: Although the Rutgers doctoral program was created in 1882, and the first PhD awarded in 1884, a doctoral program in mathematics was not organized at Rutgers until 1947. The first Ph.D. in Mathematics at Rutgers was awarded in 1951, to George Cherlin (Rutgers College '47, MSc '49). A total of 7 Ph.D.s were awarded before 1961, when the modern era began at Rutgers. Under Ken Wolfson (chair 1961-1975) the graduate program in mathematics gradually built up to a steady graduation rate of 13 doctorates per year in the mid-1970's. It later shrank in the 1980's and then expanded again in the 1990's, reaching a high of 19 doctorates in 1995. With the economic downturn in the mid-1990's, fewer students were accepted into the program, with the delayed effect that the number of doctorates has shrunk since 2000.

 

Number of doctorates per decade: 1950's 1960's 1970's 1980's 1990's 2000's 2010's
5 41 107 75 138 93 100  to May 2017

Rutgers Math Phd's 1951-Present

 NameGraduatedAdvisorFirst job after RU
2015-2019: 31 Ph.D.'s TOP
  Ross Berkowitz May 2017 Swastik Kopparty

Yale University, CT

  Sjuvon Chung May 2017 Anders Buch Ohio State University, OH
  Patrick Devlin May 2017 Jeffry Kahn Yale University, CT
  Michael Donders May 2017 Jozsef Beck  Jane Street Capital, NY
  Nathan Fox May 2017 Doron Zeilberger The College of Wooster, Ohio
  Siao-Hao Guo May 2017 Natasa Sesum Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
  Rachel Levanger May 2017 Konstantin Michaikow University of Pennsylvania, PA
  Pedro Pontes May 2017 Henryk Iwaniec Bloomberg, NY
  Liming Sun May 2017 YanYan Li Johns Hopkins University, MD
  Charles Wolf May 2017 Shubhangi Saraf Ben Gurion University, Israel
  Xukai Yan May 2017 YanYan Li Georgia Tech, GA
  Jacob Baron Oct 2016 Jeffry Kahn Department of Defense
  Timothy Naumovitz Oct 2016 Michael Saks Google, Inc., Mountainview, CA
  Bence Borda May 2016 Jozsef Beck  
  Bud Coulson May 2016 James Lepowsky Rutgers University, NJ
  Charles Wes Cowan May 2016 Michael Katehakis Rutgers University, NJ
  Brian Garnett May 2016 Swastik Kopparty Rutgers University, NJ
  Burak Kaya May 2016 Simon Thomas Middle East Technical University, Turkey
  John Kim May 2016 Swastik Kopparty Virtu Financial, NYC
  Howard Nuer May 2016 Lev Borisov Northeastern University, Boston, MA
  Matthew Russell May 2016 V. Retakh/D. Zeilberger Rutgers University, NJ
  Francis Seuffert May 2016 Eric Carlen  University of Pennsylvania
  Nathaniel Shar May 2016 Doron Zeilberger Google, Inc., CA
  Tien Trinh May 2016 Stephen Miller University of Colorado Boulder, CO
  Glen Wilson May 2016 Charles Weibel University of Oslo, Norway
  Jianguo Xiao May 2016 Avy Soffer Quantitative Strategies at PeerIQ, NY
  Edward Chien Oct 2015 Feng Luo Bar-Ilan University, Israel
  Manuel Larenas Oct 2015 Avy Soffer JRI Ingenieria Consulting Firm, Chile
  Zahra Aminzare May 2015 Eduardo Sontag Princeton University, Princeton, NJ
  Francesco Fiordalisi May 2015 Yi-Zhi Huang/
James Lepowsky
Bloomberg LP, Princeton, NJ
  Bin Guo May 2015 Jian Song Columbia University, New York, NY
  Simao Herdade May 2015 Endre Szemeredi Clarifai, Inc., NY
  Moulik Kallupalam Balasubramanian May 2015 Shadi Abdoire
Tahvildar-Zadeh
Rutgers University, NJ
  Shashank Kanade May 2015 James Lepowsky University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada
  Vladimir Lubyshev May 2015 Paul Feehan Cubist Systematic Strategies, LLC, NY
  John Miller May 2015 Henryk Iwaniec John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
  Kellen Myers May 2015 Doron Zeilberger Farmingdale State College, Farmingdale, NY
  Ming Xiao May 2015 Xiaojun Huang University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  Justin Bush Jan 2015 Konstantin Mischaikow Palantir Technologies, Inc. NY
  Jaret Flores Jan 2015 Charles Weibel GIS Workshop, Inc., Lincoln, NE
  Justin Gilmer Jan 2015 Michael Saks Bloomberg LP, NY
  Thomas Tyrrell Jan 2015 Jerrold Tunnell  

2010-2014: 58 Ph.D.'s
TOP

  James Dibble Oct 2014 Xiaochun Rong Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL
  Jorge Cantillo Oct 2014 Henryk Iwaniec Assurant Solutions, Miami, FL
  Michael
Marcondes de Freitas
Oct 2014 Eduardo Sontag University of Copenhagen, Denmark
  Aaron Hamm Oct 2014 Jeffry Kahn Winthrop University, Rock Hill, SC
  Debajyoti Nandi Oct 2014 Robert Wilson Chennai Mathematical Institute, India
  Kathleen Crow Craig May 2014 Eric Carlen UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
  Ved Datar May 2014 Jian Song University of Notre Dame, IN
  Knight Fu May 2014 Charles Weibel MediaMath, Boston, MA
  Zhan Li May 2014 Lev Borisov John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
  Robert McRae May 2014 James Lepowsky Beijing Int'l. Center for Math Research, China
  Yusra Naqvi May 2014 Siddhartha Sahi Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA
  Eduardo Osorio Triana May 2014 Paul Feehan Bloomberg LP, NY
  Christopher Sadowski May 2014 Lepowsky / YZ Huang Ursinus College in Collegeville, PA
  Matthew Samuel May 2014 Anders Buch Prudential Investment Management
  Jinwei Yang May 2014 Lepowsky / YZ Huang University of Notre Dame, IN
  Hui Wang Jan 2014 Haim Brezis JP Morgan, NY
 
  Brandon Bate Oct 2013 Stephen Miller Tel Aviv University (Israel)
  Susovan Pal Oct 2013 Feng Luo / Jun Hu University of Paris 11
  Vijay Ravikumar Oct 2013 Anders Buch Tata Institute for Fundamental Research (India)
  Yu Wang Oct 2013 Michael Kiessling  
  David Duncan May 2013 Chris Woodward Michigan State University
  Susan Durst May 2013 Robert Wilson University of Arizona
  Ali Maalaoui May 2013 Abbas Bahri Universitat Basel (Switzerland)
  Brian Nakamura May 2013 Doron Zeilberger CCICADA
  Priyam Patel May 2013 Feng Luo Purdue University
  Ke Wang May 2013 Van Vu IMA (University of Minnesota)
  Yunpeng Wang May 2013 YanYan Li AMSS, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Beijing)
  Tian Yang May 2013 Feng Luo Stanford University
 
  Hernan Castro Oct 2012 H. Brezis Universidad De Talga
  Robert DeMarco Oct 2012 J. Kahn CCICADA
  Vidit Nanda Oct 2012 K. Mischaikow University of Pennsylvania
  Catherine Pfaff Oct 2012 L. Mosher Laboratory Analysis of Topology and Probabilities, Aix Marseille Universite/CNRS
  Susmita Venugopalan Oct 2012 C. Woodward Tata Institute of Fundamental Research
  John Bryk May 2012 J. Tunnell John Jay College (CUNY)
  Tianling Jin May 2012 Y. Li University of Chicago
  Elizabeth Kupin May 2012 J. Beck NSA
  Camelia Pop May 2012 P. Feehan University of Pennsylvania
  Nicholas Trainor May 2012 M. Vogelius Numerix LLC (NYC)
  Jay Williams May 2012 S. Thomas California Institute of Technology
 
  V.S. Padmini Mukkamala October 2011 J. Pack and M. Szegedy McDaniel college, Hungary; then IIT, India
  Amit Priyadarshi October 2011 R. Nussbaum Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi
  Andrew Baxter May 2011 D. Zeilberger Penn State University
  Gabriel Bouch May 2011 E. Carlen Freedom Church, Philadelphia
  Emilie Hogan May 2011 D. Zeilberger Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
  Brent Young May 2011 M. Kiessling Rutgers University; Cologne University (Germany)
  Linh Tran Jan 2011 V. Vu University of Washington
 
  Nan Li Oct 2010 X. Rong University of Notre Dame
  Jin Wang Oct 2010 P. Feehan Ernst & Young LLP
  Yuan Yuan Oct 2010 X. Huang John Hopkins University
  Sara Blight May 2010 H. Iwaniec National Security Agency at Fort Meade
  Goran Djankovic May 2010 H. Iwaniec Mathematical Institute of the Serbian Academy of Arts and Sciences
  Liviu Ilinca May 2010 J. Kahn Indiana University
  Hoi Nguyen May 2010 V. Vu University of Pennsylvania
  Wesley Pegden May 2010 J. Beck NYU (Courant Institute), NSF Postdoc
  Daniel Staley May 2010 S. Ferry Yodle, Inc.
  Paul Ellis Jan 2010 S. Thomas University of Connecticut
  Jawon Koo Jan 2010 P. Feehan South Korea
  Ming Shi Jan 2010 P. Feehan Ernst & Young LLP

2005-2009: 50 Ph.D.'s
TOP

  Ila Leigh Cobbs Oct 2009 L. Carbone Lebanon Valley College
  Paul Raff Oct 2009 D. Zeilberger Rutgers University
  Reza Rezazadegan Oct 2009 C. Woodward Aarhus University
  Thomas Robinson Oct 2009 J. Lepowsky Rutgers University
  Scott Schneider Oct 2009 S. Thomas Wesleyan University
  Biao Yin Oct 2009 Y. Li University of Connecticut
  Yuan Zhang Oct 2009 X. Huang UCSD
  Philip M. Wood May 2009 V. Vu NSF Postdoc, UCLA, then Stanford University
  Eric Rowland May 2009 D. Zeilberger Tulane University
  Luc Nguyen May 2009 Y. Li Univ. of Oxford
  Michael Neiman May 2009 J. Kahn Univ. of California
  Ian Levitt May 2009 E. Szemeredi Federal Aviation Administration
  Liming Wang Oct. 2008 E. Sontag U.C. Irvine
  Sikimeti Ma'u Oct. 2008 C. Woodward Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  Thotsaporn Thanatipanonda Oct. 2008 D. Zeilberger Dickinson College
  Ellen (Shiting) Bao May 2008 Y. Li University of Minnesota
  Sam Coskey May 2008 S. Thomas CUNY
  Colleen Duffy May 2008 R. Wilson U. Wisconsin-Eau Claire
  Ren Guo May 2008 F. Luo University of Minnesota
  Lara Pudwell May 2008 D. Zeilberger Valparaiso University
  Jared Speck May 2008 M. Kiessling/S. Tahvildar-Zadeh Princeton University
  Chris Stucchio Jan. 2008 A. Soffer Courant Institute (NSF postdoc)
  Derek Hansen Jan. 2008 M. Vogelius Rice University
  Kevin Costello Oct. 2007 V. Vu Institute for Advanced Study
  Benjamin Kennedy Oct. 2007 R. Nussbaum Gettysburg College
  Brian Lins Oct. 2007 R. Nussbaum Dickinson College
  Sujith Vijay May 2007 J. Beck Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  Michael Weingart May 2007 F. Knop Rutgers-New Brunswick
  Haoyuan Xu May 2007 Y. Li Univ. of Connecticut
 
  Corina Calinescu Oct. 2006 J. Lepowsky Ohio State Univ.
  William Cuckler Oct. 2006 J. Kahn Univ. of Delaware
  Thuy Pham Oct. 2006 W. Vasconcelos Univ. of Toronto
  Moa Apagodu May 2006 D. Zeilberger Virginia Commonwealth Univ.
  Satadal Ganguly May 2006 H. Iwaniec Inst. of Mathematical Sciences, India
  Roman Holowinsky May 2006 H. Iwaniec The Inst. for Advanced Study
  Qinian Jin May 2006 Y. Li Univ. of Texas
  Rich Mikula May 2006 Y. Li William Paterson Univ.
  Vincent Vatter Jan. 2006 D. Zeilberger Univ. of St. Andrews, Scotland
 
  German Enciso Oct. 2005 E. Sontag Math Biology Inst., Ohio State Univ.
  Liang Kong Oct. 2005 Y.-Z. Huang Max Planck Inst. & IHES (Bures)
  David Nacin Oct. 2005 R. Wilson William Paterson Univ.
  Sasa Radomirovic Oct. 2005 J. Tunnell Univ. of Trondheim, Norway
  Nick Weininger Oct. 2005 J. Kahn Google Inc, Mountain View
  Kia Dalili May 2005 W. Vasconcelos Dalhousie Univ.
  Aaron Lauve May 2005 V. Retakh Univ. of Quebec, Montreal
  Kai Medville May 2005 M. Vogelius Inst. for Math. and its Applications, Minneapolis
  Augusto Ponce May 2005 H. Brezis Inst. for Advanced Study & Univ. of Paris
  Yongzhong Xu May 2005 A. Bahri NYU (Courant Inst.)
  Laura Ciobanu Jan. 2005 C. Sims CRM Barcelona
  Eva Curry Jan. 2005 R. Gundy Dalhousie Univ.

2000-2004: 43 Ph.D.'s
TOP

  Pieter Blue Oct. 2004 A. Soffer Univ. of Toronto
  Jeff Burdges Oct. 2004 G. Cherlin Univ. Wurzburg, Germany
  Raju Chelluri Oct. 2004 H. Iwaniec Deceased
  Stephen Hartke Oct. 2004 F. Roberts Univ. of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
  Xiaoqing Li Oct. 2004 H. Iwaniec Columbia Univ.
  Alfredo Rios Oct. 2004 R. Gundy Lehigh Univ.
  Eric Sundberg Oct. 2004 J. Beck Whittier College
  Klay Kruczek May 2004 J. Beck Univ. of Western Oregon
  Aobing Li May 2004 Y. Li Inst. for Advanced Study and Univ. of Wisconsin
  XiaoYong Li May 2004 L. Shepp Industry (Contract Research Org)
  Waldeck Schutzer May 2004 S. Sahi U. Federal de Sao Carlos, Brazil
  Matt Young May 2004 H. Iwaniec American Inst. of Mathematics and Stanford Univ.
  Lin Zhang May 2004 J. Lepowsky Industry
  Carlo Mazza Jan. 2004 C. Weibel Univ. of Paris
 
  Rodney Biezuner Oct. 2003 Y. Li U. Minas-Gervais/Belo Horizonte, Brazil
  David Radnell Oct. 2003 Y.-Z. Huang Univ. of Michigan
  Malka Rosenthal Oct. 2003 M. Saks Iona College
  James Taylor Oct. 2003 S. Goldstein Iowa State Univ.
  Yuka Taylor Oct. 2003 C. Woodward George Washington Univ.
  Madalena Chaves May 2003 E. Sontag RU/Industry
  Jooyoun Hong May 2003 W. Vasconcelos Purdue Univ.
  Liangyi Zhao May 2003 H. Iwaniec U.S. Military Academy (West Point)
  Louis Dupaigne Jan. 2003 H. Brezis Univ. of Paris VI
  Xiaodong Sun Jan. 2003 M. Saks Inst. for Advanced Study
 
  David Galvin Oct. 2002 J. Kahn Microsoft Corp., Seattle
  Takao Sakuraba May 2002 G. Goldin Rutgers
  Juan Davila Jan. 2002 H. Brezis Univ. de Santiago, Chile
 
  Brian Ingalls Oct. 2001 E. Sontag Waterloo Univ.
  Antun Milas Oct. 2001 J. Lepowsky Univ. of Arizona
  Yi Zhao Oct. 2001 E. Szemeredi Univ. of Illinois (Chicago)
  Bernardo Abrego May 2001 J. Beck California State-Northridge
  Silvia Fernandez May 2001 J. Beck California State-Northridge
  Maurice Hasson May 2001 R. Gundy Univ. of Arizona
  Cliff Smyth May 2001 M. Saks Carnegie Mellon and Inst. for Advanced Study
  Darko Volkov May 2001 M. Vogelius NJIT
  Steve Warner May 2001 S. Thomas Penn. State, Reading
  Lei Zhang May 2001 Y. Li Texas A&M
 
  Paul Dreyer Oct. 2000 F. Roberts Rand Corp.
  Ryan Martin Oct. 2000 E. Szemeredi Carnegie Mellon Univ.
  John Nahay May 2000 R. Cohn Monmouth Univ.
  Misha Krichman Jan. 2000 E. Sontag UCLA (Mech. Eng'g.)
  Yi Liu Jan. 2000 F. Luo Rutgers
  Michael Malisoff Jan. 2000 H. Sussmann Washington Univ. (St. Louis)
 


1995-1999: 72 Ph.D.'s

TOP

  Dov Chelst Oct. 1999 J. Lebowitz DeVry Inst.
  Terri Girardi Oct. 1999 J. Tunnell Fordham Univ.
  Xin Guo Oct. 1999 L. Shepp Univ. of Alberta/IBM (Financial Statistics)
  Pirkko Kuusela Oct. 1999 D. Ocone Industry (Finland)
  Marco Lenci Oct. 1999 J. Lebowitz SUNY Stony Brook
  Paul O'Donnell Oct. 1999 J. Komlos Drew Univ.
  Sara Soffer Oct. 1999 J. Komlos Princeton HS
  Yang Yu Oct. 1999 J. Kahn Cal Tech
  Garikai Campbell Jan. 1999 J. Tunnell Swarthmore College
  A. Kazarnovskii Krol Jan. 1999 I. Gelfand Yale Univ.
  Harri Ojanen Jan. 1999 R. Wheeden Lumeo Software,Inc. Finland
 
  Senchun Lin Oct. 1998 T. Weinstein Industry (software)
  Jason Yuenger Oct. 1998 J. Taylor J. P. Morgan Stanley (Finance)
  Rita Csákány May 1998 J. Kahn Technical Univ. of Budapest, Hungary
  Rick Desper May 1998 M. Farach National Insitutes of Health
  Tor Gunston May 1998 W. Vasconcelos EDS (Morris Plains, NJ)
  Carol Hamer May 1998 J. Tunnell Airial Conseil, France
  Emanuel Kowalski May 1998 H. Iwaniec Princeton Univ./Inst. for Advanced Study
  Luca Mauri May 1998 M. Tierney Univ. of Como, Italy
  Li Sheng (OR) May 1998 F. Roberts Drexel Univ.
  Tong Tu May 1998 R. Falk Bloomberg (Financial Services Industry)
  Shaoji Xu (OR) May 1998 F. Roberts Bell Labs
 
  Amine Asselah Oct. 1997 J. Lebowitz ETH Zurich
  Rodica Costin Oct. 1997 M. Kruskal Mathematical Sciences Research Inst.
  Luke Higgins Oct. 1997 T. Weinstein Brigham Young Univ., Salt Lake City
  Dan Kling Oct. 1997 F. Luo Rutgers-IEEE project
  Wanglai Li Oct. 1997 J. Lepowsky / R. Wilson Telecommunications industry
  Richard Ng Oct. 1997 E. Taft Univ. of California-Santa Cruz
  Dan Radulescu Oct. 1997 J. Lebowitz Industry
  Luisa R. Doering May 1997 W. Vasconcelos Univ. Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
  Donna Fengya May 1997 M. Vogelius James Madison Univ.
  Dave Reimer May 1997 J. Beck IAS/Trenton State
  Arpad Toth May 1997 W. Duke U. Michigan
  Han Zuhong May 1997 F. Treves Finance industry
  Y. Chitour Jan. 1997 H. Sussmann Univ. of Pisa, Italy
  Raika Dehy Jan. 1997 O. Mathieu Univ. of Strasbourg, France (ATER)
  Yi Zhang Jan. 1997 S. Thomas Univ. Michigan
 
  Katrina Barron Oct. 1996 J. Lepowsky / Y.-Z. Huang Univ. of California-Santa Cruz
  Galin Georgiev Oct. 1996 J. Lepowsky Inst. for Advanced Study
  M. Losada Oct. 1996 S. Thomas Antonio Narino Univ. (Colombia)
  Gretchen Ostheimer Oct. 1996 C. Sims Tufts Univ.
  Aleksandar Pekec Oct. 1996 F. Roberts BRICS, Denmark
  Rosane Ushirobira Oct. 1996 O. Mathieu Univ. of Strasbourg, France (ATER)
  Meijun Zhu Oct. 1996 Y. Li U British Columbia
  Dave Anderson May 1996 J. Taylor West Point / ARL
  Jim Bennett May 1996 S. Thomas Std.Commercial Lines
  Tom Bohman May 1996 J. Kahn MIT/MSRI then Carnegie Mellon U.
  M.J. Kelley May 1996 J. Taylor Texas A&M
  Naomi Klarreich May 1996 T. Weinstein Case Western Reserve Univ.
  Eddie Lo May 1996 C. Sims NSA
  Shari Moskow May 1996 M. Vogelius Inst. for Math. and its Applications (Minneapolis)
  John Shareshian May 1996 R. Lyons Mathematical Sciences Research Inst. (Berkeley)
  J-Y Patrick Tai May 1996 P. Landweber Dartmouth
 
 
  Yansong Chen Oct. 1995 A. Bahri  
  Ovidiu Costin Oct. 1995 J. Lebowitz / M. Kruskal
  Jason Jones Oct. 1995 C. Weibel  
  Andrew Leahy Oct. 1995 F. Knop  
  Martin Strauss Oct. 1995 E. Allender  
  Juan Alvarez-Paiva   1995 T. Petrie  
  Wen-Yun Gao May 1995 J. Tunnell / D. Rohrlich
  G. Giacomin May 1995 J. Lebowitz  
  Ying Huang May 1995 I. Daubechies / R. Wheeden
  Susan Morey May 1995 W. Vasconcelos  
  Dale Peterson May 1995 F. Roberts  
  Claudia Polini   1995 W. Vasconcelos  
  Yasmine Sanderson May 1995 R. Wilson / O. Mathieu
  Robert Smyth May 1995 T. Weinstein  
  Maria Vaz Pinto May 1995 W. Vasconcelos  
  David W. Webb May 1995 S. Chanillo / B. Muckenhoupt
  Jiahai Xie May 1995 R. Goodman  
  Hong Guo Jan. 1995 J. Lepowsky  
 
1990-1994: 66 Ph.D.'s
TOP

  A. Tuna Altınel Oct. 1994 G. Cherlin  
  Randall Fairman Oct. 1994 R. Lyons  
  Andrés Fundia Oct. 1994 M. Saks  
  Mark Kayll Oct. 1994 J. Kahn  
  Renee Koplon Oct. 1994 E. Sontag  
  Guillaume Sanje-Mpacko Oct. 1994 L. Corwin / R. Goodman
  Jim Sharp Oct. 1994 S. Thomas  
  Todd Trimble Oct. 1994 M. Tierney  
  Rob Hochberg May 1994 J. Beck  
  Elizabeth Jurisich May 1994 R. Wilson / J. Lepowsky
  Haisheng Li May 1994 J. Lepowsky / R. Wilson
  Guotian Lin May 1994 A. Kupiainen  
  András Pluhár May 1994 J. Beck (RUTCOR)  
  András Stipzicz May 1994 T. Petrie  
  Zoltán Szabó May 1994 T. Petrie  
  Chuanfu Xie May 1994 J. Lepowsky / R. Wilson
  Sergio Zani Jan. 1994 R. Wheeden  
 
  Francesca Albertini Oct. 1993 E. Sontag  
  Jeong Han Kim Oct. 1993 J. Kahn  
  Junjie Xiong Oct. 1993 P. Hansen  
  Yudi Yang Oct. 1993 H. Sussmann  
  Xin Ke May 1993 J. Beck  
  Wenzhi Luo May 1993 H. Iwaniec  
  Paolo Dai Pra Jan. 1993 J. Lebowitz  
  Tejinder Neelon Jan. 1993 F. Treves  
  Hasna Riahi Jan. 1993 A. Bahri  
  Andrew Roosen Jan. 1993 J. Taylor  
 
  Lin Yuandan Oct. 1992 E. Sontag  
  Wensheng Liu Oct. 1992 H. Sussmann  
  Lu Xiaoyun Oct. 1992 J. Kahn  
  Steven Sessions Oct. 1992 P. Landweber  
  Tang Guoqing Oct. 1992 H. Sussmann  
  Ed Aboufadel May 1992 J. Cronin-Scanlon  
  Gábor Francsics May 1992 F. Treves  
  Nigel Pitt May 1992 H. Iwaniec  
  Denise Sakai May 1992 F. Roberts (RUTCOR)  
  Xueqing Tang May 1992 A. Ben-Israel (RUTCOR)  
  Jianming Xu May 1992 R. Falk  
  Xiaoping Xu May 1992 J. Lepowsky / R. Wilson
 
  Stephen Alessandrini Oct. 1991 R. Falk  
  Géza Bohus Oct. 1991 J. Kahn  
  Da-mu Cai Oct. 1991 R. Falk  
  Gustavo Comezana Oct. 1991 J. Shaneson  
  Brenda Latka Oct. 1991 G. Cherlin  
  Richard Rosengarten Oct. 1991 G. Cherlin  
  To Tze-ming Oct. 1991 N. Wallach  
  Barr Von Oehsen Oct. 1991 P. Landweber  
  Xianwen Xie Oct. 1991 R. Nussbaum  
  Chua Seng-Kee May 1991 R. Wheeden  
  Jose C. Fernandes May 1991 R. Wheeden  
  Linda Holt May 1991 R. M. Beals  
  Terry Lohrenz May 1991 F. Treves  
  Lu Guozhen May 1991 S. Chanillo  
  Chi Wang May 1991 F. Roberts (RUTCOR)  
 
  Sandra Caravella Oct. 1990 T. Petrie  
  Yi-Zhi Huang Oct. 1990 J. Lepowsky  
  Seong Joo Kang Oct. 1990 R. M. Beals  
  Yuan Wang Oct. 1990 E. Sontag  
  Glenn Hurlbert May 1990 R. Graham  
  Cristiano Husu May 1990 J. Lepowsky  
  Garth Isaak May 1990 F. Roberts (RUTCOR)  
  Julio Kuplinsky May 1990 P. Hansen  
  Peter Ostapenko May 1990 R. Goodman  
  J. Asmus Petersen May 1990 F. Treves  
  Raymond Ross May 1990 D. Rohrlich  
  Zangwill Rosenbaum Jan. 1990 F. Roberts  
 
1980-1989: 75 Ph.D.'s
TOP

  Enriqueta Carrington Oct. 1989 N. Wallach  
  Andrzej Karwowski Oct. 1989 J. Lebowitz  
  Shari Prevost Oct. 1989 R. Wilson  
  Barry Tesman Oct. 1989 F. Roberts  
  Jan Wehr Oct. 1989 M. Aizenman  
  Krzysztof Wysocki Oct. 1989 R. Nussbaum  
  Peisen Zhang Oct. 1989 J. Lebowitz  
 
  Stefano Capparelli Oct. 1988 J. Lepowsky / R. Wilson
  Carlangelo Liverani Oct. 1988 J. Lebowitz  
  Abdelhamid Meziani Oct. 1988 F. Treves  
  Jean Rynes Oct. 1988 C. Weibel  
  Haruo Tsukuda Oct. 1988 J. Lepowsky / I. Frenkel
  Suh-Ryung Kim   1988 F. Roberts
  Pierluigi Frajria Jan. 1988 N. Wallach  
  Willi Schwarz Jan. 1988 N. Wallach  
 
  Shiferaw Berhanu Oct. 1987 F. Treves  
  Yves Crama Oct. 1987 P. Hammer  
  Beatriz de Lafferriere Oct. 1987 W. Petryshyn  
  Stefano Olla Oct. 1987 J. Lebowitz  
  David Barsky May 1987 M. Aizenman  
  Mark Hughes May 1987 T. Petrie  
  João Sampaio May 1987 T. Petrie  
 
  Gerardo Lafferriere Oct. 1986 H. Sussmann  
  Monica Nicolau Oct. 1986 J. Shaneson  
  Heinz Schaettler Oct. 1986 H. Sussmann  
  Carlos Videla Oct. 1986 G. Cherlin  
  Jim Maloney May 1986 G. Cherlin  
  Rafael Villareal May 1986 W. Vasconcelos  
  Leila Figueiredo Jan. 1986 J. Lepowsky  
  Marly Mandia Jan. 1986 R. Wilson  
  Abigail Thompson Jan. 1986 J. Shaneson  
 
  Lucilia Borsari Oct. 1985 P. Landweber  
  Paulo Cordaro Oct. 1985 F. Treves  
  Kent Orr Oct. 1985 J. Shaneson  
  Yuh-Dong Tsai Oct. 1985 T. Petrie  
  H. Leroy Hutson May 1985 W. Vasconcelos  
  Gary Martin May 1985 G. Cherlin  
  John C.M. Nash May 1985 M. Nathanson  
  Arundhati Raychaudhuri May 1985 F. Roberts  
 
  Yungchen Cheng Oct. 1984 E. Taft  
  Richard J. Pfister Oct. 1984 J. Lepowsky  
  Norman Adams May 1984 M. Tierney  
  Eung Chun Cho May 1984 T. Petrie  
  Terence Lindgren May 1984 M. Tierney  
  Robert Opsut May 1984 F. Roberts  
  Dong Youp Suh May 1984 T. Petrie  
 
  Joan Farmer Amgott Oct. 1983 J. Lebowitz  
  Steven Chapin Oct. 1983 R. Nussbaum  
  Guillermo Ferreyra Oct. 1983 H. Sussmann  
  Robert S. Maier Oct. 1983 J. Lebowitz  
  David Mitzman Oct. 1983 J. Lepowsky  
  Steven Amgott May 1983 B. Mitchell  
  Kil Hyun Kwon May 1983 F. Treves  
  Jiang Jin Sheng May 1983 R. Falk  
  Carol Ann Keller Jan. 1983 M. Tierney  
  Peter Monk Jan. 1983 R. Falk  
  Alan Siegel Jan. 1983 T. Petrie  
 
  Zsu(zsanna) Kadas Oct. 1982 H. Othmer  
  Kailash C. Misra Oct. 1982 R. Wilson  
  Stephen Breen June 1982 J. Lebowitz  
  Jorge Gerszonowicz June 1982 F. Treves  
  Paul Schachter June 1982 J. Shaneson  
  Joanne Darken Jan. 1982 H. Sussmann  
  Martin Farber Jan. 1982 P. Hell  
 
  Ernst Adams Oct. 1981 B. Muckenhoupt  
  Dohan Kim Oct. 1981 F. Treves  
  Margaret Barry-Cozzens June 1981 F. Roberts
  David Hecker June 1981 W. Sweeney
  Arne Meurman June 1981 J. Lepowsky  
 
  Shirlei Serconek Oct. 1980 R. Wilson  
  Susan Szczepanski Oct. 1980 J. Shaneson  
  Michael Weiss June 1980 G. Cherlin
  Cheng-Shung Ko Jan. 1980 P. Hell  
  Ira L. Robbin Jan. 1980 E. Speer  
  Bernadette Tutinas Jan. 1980 D. Gorenstein
 
1970-1979: 107 Ph.D.'s
TOP

  Stephen Andrilli Oct. 1979 C. Sims  
  Edward Deloff Oct. 1979 J. D'Atri  
  Stephen Davis Oct. 1979 R. Lyons  
  Regina Mladineo Oct. 1979 N. Levitt  
  Richard Watnick Oct. 1979 J. Rosenstein  
  Joseph McDonough June 1979 J. Cronin-Scanlon  
 
  Max Ashkenazi Oct. 1978 J. Cronin-Scanlon  
  Nancy H. Baxter Oct. 1978 R. Nussbaum  
  Nan-hung Chen Oct. 1978 B. Osofsky  
  Karl Heinz Dovermann Oct. 1978 T. Petrie  
  Stephen Hoyle Oct. 1978 J. Cronin-Scanlon  
  Mark Hunacek Oct. 1978 R. Wilson  
  Rochelle Leibowitz Oct. 1978 F. Roberts  
  Claude Pichet Oct. 1978 N. Wallach  
  Theodore Wilson Oct. 1978 J. Shaneson  
  Vernon Eagle Jr. June 1978 A. Kosinski  
  Douglas Kurtz June 1978 R. Wheeden  
  Susan Niefield June 1978 B. Mitchell  
  Alvany Rocha Jan. 1978 N. Wallach  
 
  William Heck Oct. 1977 E. Ellentuck  
  Justine Skalba Oct. 1977 C. Sims  
  Richard Stafford Oct. 1977 M. O'Nan  
  Leh-Sheng Tang Oct. 1977 H. Sussmann  
  Adalberto Bergamasco June 1977 J. Barros-Neto  
  Ronald Dotzel June 1977 G. Bredon  
  Sarah Glaz June 1977 W. Vasconcelos  
  Charles Schwartz June 1977 W. Hoyt  
  Maria Welleda Silva June 1977 N. Wallach  
  Valdis Vijums June 1977 J. Shaneson  
  Roman W-C Wong June 1977 B. Mitchell  
  Edward Conjura Jan. 1977 W. Petryshyn  
  Anna Silverstein Jan. 1977 J.C.E. Dekker  
 
  Edgar Becerra-Bertram Oct. 1976 J. Shaneson  
  Oscar Campoli Oct. 1976 N. Wallach  
  Janey Daccach Oct. 1976 P. Landweber  
  Linda Anne Grieco Oct. 1976 C. Sims  
  Shyn-Ling Lee Oct. 1976 S. Leader  
  Walter Mallory Oct. 1976 E. Ellentuck  
  Isabel Miatello Oct. 1976 G. Bredon  
  Roberto Miatello Oct. 1976 N. Wallach  
  Sandra Brook June 1976 S. Leader  
  Letitia Seese(Korbley) June 1976 F. Treves  
  James Carrig Jan. 1976 W. Vasconcelos  
  Andrew Chermak Jan. 1976 D. Gorenstein  
  Stephen Fellner Jan. 1976 J. Rosenstein  
  Ricardo Morais Jan. 1976 E. Ellentuck  
 
  Luis Frota-Mattos Oct. 1975 R. Goodman  
  Leslie Jones   1975 P. Landweber  
  Gerard Kiernan Oct. 1975 D. Gorenstein  
  Hsiao-wei Kuo Oct. 1975 B. Muckenhoupt  
  Edward Lotkowski Oct. 1975 R. Wheeden  
  Simon Aloff June 1975 J. Shaneson  
  Ítalo Déjter June 1975 T. Petrie  
  Gary Gundersen June 1975 R. Goodman  
  Russell John June 1975 R. Wheeden  
  Thomas Marlowe June 1975 E. Taft  
  Petronije Milojevic June 1975 W. Petryshyn  
  Jay Shapiro June 1975 B. Osofsky  
  Ira J. Papick Jan. 1975 D. Dobbs  
 
  Jui-Chi Chang Oct. 1974 D. Gorenstein  
  Ching-an C. Cheng Oct. 1974 B. Mitchell  
  Jeffrey Dawson Oct. 1974 W. Vasconcelos  
  Edward Dougherty Oct. 1974 J. Elliott  
  Kenneth Klinger Oct. 1974 D. Gorenstein  
  Edward Boyno June 1974 G. Bredon  
  Roosevelt Gentry June 1974 V. Williams  
  Roy Goldman June 1974 F. Treves  
  Jorge Hounie June 1974 F. Treves  
  Roger Jones June 1974 R. Gundy  
  Alan Meyerhoff June 1974 T. Petrie  
  Noriko Yui June 1974 R. Bumby  
  David Kopcso Jan. 1974 R. Wilson  
 
  Antonio Gilioli Oct. 1973 F. Treves  
  Brian Greenberg Oct. 1973 W. Vasconcelos  
  Richard Guhl Oct. 1973 J.C.E. Dekker  
  Saroj Jain Oct. 1973 C. Faith  
  Marian Kelterborn Oct. 1973 S. Leader  
  Ana Viola Prioli Oct. 1973 W. Vasconcelos  
  Jorge Viola Prioli Oct. 1973 B. Osofsky  
  Barry J. Arnow June 1973 S. Leader  
  Wolf Iberkleid June 1973 P. Landweber  
  Northrup Fowler June 1973 J.C.E. Dekker  
  Eugene Gaydos June 1973 S. Leader  
  Sarah J. Gottlieb June 1973 E. Taft  
  Hu Sheng June 1973 W. Vasconcelos  
  Rudolf Rucker Jan. 1973 E. Ellentuck  
 
  Carl Bredlau Oct. 1972 E. Ellentuck  
  Robert C. Miller Oct. 1972 D. Gorenstein  
  Cristián Sánchez June 1972 G. Bredon  
  David Slater Oct. 1972 J. Rosenstein  
 
  Ann K. Boyle Oct. 1971 C. Faith  
  Ted Williamson Oct. 1971 W. Petryshyn  
  Reginald Luke Oct. 1971 W. Mason  
  Louie Mahony Oct. 1971 A. Kosinski  
  Ranga Rao Oct. 1971 C. Faith  
  Ralph Artino June 1971 J. Barros-Neto  
  Michael Fitzpatrick June 1971 W. Petryshyn  
  Eileen Poiani June 1971 B. Muckenhoupt  
  Ira Wolf June 1971 M. Tierney  
 
  John Empoliti Oct. 1970 C. Sims  
  James Roberts Oct. 1970 S. Leader  
  David Addis Jun 1970 L. McAuley
  Peter Evanovich Jun 1970 R. Cohn
  Jeffrey Levine Jun 1970 B. Osofsky
  Roger Pitasky Jun 1970 S. Leader
  Philip Zipse Jun 1970 S. Leader
  Douglas McCarthy Jan. 1970 J. Cronin-Scanlon  
 
1961-1969: 39 Ph.D.'s
TOP

  Victor Camillo Oct. 1969 C. Faith  
  John Cozzens Oct. 1969 C. Faith  
  Charles Applebaum June 1969 J.C.E. Dekker  
  Francis Christoph June 1969 L. McAuley  
  Clifton Lando June 1969 J. Cronin-Scanlon  
  John McDonald June 1969 J. Elliott  
  William Quirin June 1969 C. Sims  
  David Wilson June 1969 L. McAuley  
  Barbara A. Lando Jan. 1969 R. Cohn  
 
  Harry Berkowitz Oct. 1968 P. Roy  
  Peter Fowler Oct. 1968 J. Elliott  
  Charles Hallahan Oct. 1968 E. Taft  
  Richard Munson Oct. 1968 W. Hoyt  
  Floyd B. Cole June 1968 J.C.E. Dekker  
  Richard Bauer Jan. 1968 R. Artzy  
 
  Robert Fraser Oct. 1967 S. Leader  
  Frode Terkelson Oct. 1967 J. Elliott  
 
  Herbert I. Brown   1966 V. Cowling  
  William H. Caldwell   1966 C. Faith  
  Matthew Hassett   1966 J.C.E. Dekker  
  Gerald S. Ungar   1966 L.F. McAuley  
  Avraham Ornstein Oct. 1966 C. Faith  
 
  Irving Bentsen   1965 R. Cohn  
  V. Mancuso Oct. 1965 B. Candless  
 
  Joseph Barback Oct. 1964 J.C.E. Dekker  
  William R. Jones   1964 H. Zimmerberg  
  William E. Kirwan   1964 M. Robertson  
  Barbara Langer Osofsky   1964 C. Faith  
  Fred J. Sansone   1964 J.C.E. Dekker  
  Chung-Lie Wang   1964 R. Carroll  
  Angelo Pelios Jan. 1964 S. Leader  

  Donald Ferguson Oct. 1963 J.C.E. Dekker  
  Eric S. Langford   1963 S. Leader  
  Albert E. Livingston   1963 M. Robertson  
  Israel Zuckerman   1963 R. Cohn  

  Leonard Gewirtzman Oct. 1962 K. Wolfson  
  Michael Lodato Oct. 1962 S. Leader  
  Charles Franke May 1962 R. Cohn  
  Richard J. Libera May 1962 M. Robertson  

1951-1960: 7 Ph.D.'s

TOP

  Ronald McHaffey   1960 K. Wolfson  
  Aaron Siegel   1960 V. Shapiro  
  John Bender   1958 M. Robertson  
  Bernard Greenspan   1958 R. Cohn  
  Richard Gabriel   1955 M. Robertson  
  Richard K. Brown   1952 M. Robertson  
  George Y. Cherlin   1951 M. Robertson  


Number of doctorates by year:

2019       2009   12   1999   11   1989   7   1979   6   1969   9  
2018       2008   11   1998   11   1988   8   1978   13   1968   6  
2017       2007   6   1997   15   1987   7   1977   13   1967   2  
2016       2006   9   1996   16   1986   9   1976   15   1966   5  
2015   4   2005   12   1995   19   1985   8   1975   13   1965   2  
2014   16   2004   15   1994   17   1984   7   1974   13   1964   7  
2013   12   2003   10   1993   10   1983   11   1973   15   1963   4  
2012   11   2002   3   1992   12   1982   7   1972   4   1962   4  
2011   7   2001   10   1991   15   1981   5   1971   9   1961   0  
2010   12   2000   6   1990   12   1980   6   1970   8   1960   2  

Return to the top.
Data before 1984 compiled by M. Jablonski. Data 1984-2005 compiled by C. Weibel.

 

 

NOTICE: Matriculated undergraduates can request special permission for closed sections of fall and spring courses only through the automated system described below. This system is available only during the special permission period, beginning shortly before the term and running through the first week of classes.

 

There are four kinds of special requests students may need to make to the undergraduate office to gain admittance to certain courses.

  • Admission to some honors courses is by permission of the department.
  • Admission to closed sections of regular courses requires a special permission number.
  • Admission to courses for which the prerequisites have been filled in an unusual way may require a prerequisite override.
  • Admission to Precalculus, Calculus I or Calculus II previously failed twice

Procedures (Fall and Spring Terms)

Honors Courses

If you are not yet registered in an honors course or an honors section of a regular course in the forthcoming semester, you need to apply for special permission by completing the appropriate Special Permission Form available online. DO NOT use the Automated Web System to submit your request!

Requests for fall courses may be submitted during the previous spring or summer; requests for spring courses during the previous fall. When filling out the form, make sure you give a valid reson for your request (e.g. previous honors course, recommendation of professor, etc). Requests will be proccessed as they are received, so long as necessary information (current grades, references, ...) is available.

If you are already registered in an honors section for the forthcoming semester and would like to switch to another section of the SAME course, you need to use the Automated Web System to submit your request during one of the three rounds. Please see below for the dates.

Prerequisite overrides

A student who is unable to register for a course because he or she lacks the proper prerequisites should not request a special permission number. Under some circumstances – for example, if the student has taken appropriate prerequisite courses elsewhere, and these are not yet credited to his or her Rutgers transcript – please fill out a prerequisite override form.

If justification for receiving a prerequisite override is too complicated to adequately describe on the form on the online website, please go to the Advising Office of the Math Dept, room 308 of the Hill Center.

Closed Sections

Because of the high demand for many of the math department classes, many course sections are filled early in registration. Once the course is filled it is listed as Closed. However, we generally leave some spots open in the course to accomodate late registrants and transfer students. These final spots are assigned through the special permission for closed section process which starts shortly before the semester begins and continues through the first week of the semester. A student should first attempt to register through the Rutgers Web Registration System. If all sections that the student can take are closed, the student should submit a special permission form once the special permission process opens. (The schedule for the process will be listed on this web page shortly before the semester begins.)

The department makes a significant effort to accommodate as many students as possible during the process, and generally satisfies most of them, but unfortunately there is often not enough room to grant all requests.

 

 Re-taking Precalculus, Calculus I or Calculus II previously failed twice



Students who have failed Precalculus, Calculus I or Calculus II twice are not allowed by WebReg to register for the course a third time. These students should fill out the following online form and meet with the appropriate advisor. Students who have failed Precalculus twice must meet with the Basic Skills ad Precalculus advisor in LSH-B room 102A, LIV. Students who have failed Calculus I or Calculus II twice must meet with the advisor in HILL 308 BUSH. Afterwards, the students have to submit a request for a special permission number following the procedure for closed sections.

Students belonging to schools different from SAS, should go see their dean before meeting with one of the advisors.  

    • Fall and Spring Terms

      • Matriculated undergraduates should request special permission for admission to closed sections using the automated special permission system described below. While the special permission process is ongoing students should attend a section that they are trying to enter via special permission, so that no class time will be missed.
      • Non-matriculated undergraduate students and graduate students should request special permission for admission to closed sections by completing the appropriate special permission form available online or in the Mathematics Undergraduate Office located in Hill Center, Room 303 on Busch Campus. Decisions on these requests will be made during the first week of classes.

Fall 2017 Special Permission Rounds

Round 1:

Begins: 12:01am, Friday, August 25
Ends: 11:00pm, Wednesday, August 30
Decision Date: 4:00pm, Friday, September 1

Round 2:

 Begins: 5:00pm, Friday, September 1
 Ends: 4:00pm, Thursday, September 7
Decision Date: 12:00pm, Saturday, September 9

Round 3:

 Begins: 5:00pm, Saturday, September 9
 Ends: 4:00pm, Monday, September 11
Decision Date: 4:00pm, Tuesday, September 12
 

NOTE: Please be aware of the following -

 Last day to DROP courses without a "W" is Tuesday, September 12

Last day to ADD courses is Wednesday, September 13

Course selection for new requests will be unavailable between the end of one round and the start of the next

 

If you receive an email informing you that your request has been
granted, you must login within 3 days of when the email is sent
in order to retrieve your special permission number.

Automated special permission system

For CLOSED SECTIONS – For matriculated undergraduates
Fall and Spring Semesters

Automated Web System
Enter Here

Special Note: If you are unable to load the page when following the 'Enter Here' link, please clear your browser's cache and cookies, close the broswer, then re-open and try again.

NOTE: When vieing the Special Permission login page for the first time, you may get a notice that the SSL certificate is invalid. You can disregard this and know that the site is still perfectly secure. In order to fix this, please add a permanent exception and reload the page. If you need help with this, please see our documentation regrading this issue: Certificate Errors

 

  • Who Can Use the Online Special Permission System?
    Matriculated undergraduates who wish to get special permission to enter closed sections of mathematics courses should use the mathematics department's web-based system.
  • How Do I Login?
    Students need to use their NetID and password to access the online special permission system. Students using this system DO NOT need to have their own computer accounts or e-mail addresses. They only need access to the web which is available on all campuses. Deans' Offices should be prepared to help disabled students with their special permission requests.

With the approval of the department, undergraduates may take graduate courses, under three conditions.

  1. There are no undergraduate courses in mathematics which are more appropriate for the student's program.
  2. Prior achievement in undergraduate or graduate mathematics courses provides a clear indication of the student's ability to do well in graduate level work.
  3. Admission of the student to the graduate course is consistent with the needs and desires of the graduate program.

Application Procedure

Students wishing to take graduate courses should consult the chair of the honors committee (Committee on Honors and Prizes), who will verify the first two conditions. If approved by the chair of the honors committee, the application will be reviewed by the Graduate Director in consultation with the instructor responsible for the course.

Who should take graduate courses?

Students who wish to take graduate courses should familiarize themselves with the other special opportunities available for undergraduates in the mathematics department, including the Honors Track, the Directed Reading Program, and Research Opportunities for Undergraduates. See our Undergraduate Program page for the relevant links.

Graduate courses are sometimes used to satisfy requirements for graduating with honors; specifically, a graduate course may count as an mathematics honors graduation unit. Students who wish to have a graduate course count as an honors unit must submit an application for approval of alternative honors graduation unit to the undergraduate math office.

Students in the honors track are encouraged to take some graduate courses in their senior year.


 

Alumni and Alumnae of the Rutgers and Douglass Math Programs and Former Faculty

Interested in what you can do with, or in spite of, a degree in mathematics? The following are a few publicly-available profiles of Rutgers and Douglass math graduates and former faculty.

Selected Profiles of Alumni and Alumnae of the Rutgers and Douglass Undergraduate Math Program

Allan Borodin of the University of Toronto is "the recipient of the 2008 CRM-Fields-PIMS Prize, in recognition of his exceptional achievement. Professor Borodin is a world leader in the mathematical foundations of computer science. His influence on theoretical computer science has been enormous, and its scope very broad. Jon Kleinberg, winner of the 2006 Nevanlinna Prize, writes of Borodin, "he is one of the few researchers for whom one can cite examples of impact on nearly every area of theory, and his work is characterized by a profound taste in choice of problems, and deep connections with broader issues in computer science." Allan Borodin has made fundamental contributions to many areas, including algebraic computations, resource tradeoffs, routing in interconnection networks, parallel algorithms, online algorithms, and adversarial queuing theory. Professor Borodin received his B.A. in Mathematics from Rutgers University in 1963, his M.S. in Electrical Engineering & Computer Science in 1966 from Stevens Institute of Technology, and his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Cornell University in 1969. From http://www.fields.utoronto.ca/press/07-08/071206.borodin.html .

Simeon DeWitt "was the first math major at Rutgers. He became General George Washington's Chief Geographer in the Revolutionary War. His maps of Yorktown helped win the final battle of that war. Afterwards (1784-1834) he was the Surveyor General for New York State; he helped to plan the Erie Canal, and to develop the grid system of streets and avenues in New York City, among other things."  https://www.math.uh.edu/~tomforde/famous.html

Inessa Epstein is Vice President at Morgan Stanley. She earned a Ph.D. in Mathematics at UCLA and won the Sacks Prize for recognition for the best dissertation in the field of mathematical logic worldwide in 2008. From https://www.linkedin.com/in/inessa-epstein-ph-d-b0a92914 .

Lorraine Fesq is "the Chief Technologist for the Systems Engineering and Formulation Division at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology. She leads NASA's Fault Management Community of Practice and co-leads the NASA Software Architecture Review Board. She recently spearheaded the development of the NASA Fault Management Handbook. Lorraine has contributed to over a dozen spacecraft projects and held a teaching and research position in MIT's Aeronautics/Astronautics Department. Lorraine holds two patents and has received numerous awards, including NASA's Public Service Medal and NASA's Exceptional Achievement Honor Award. She received the BA in Mathematics from Rutgers University and the MS and PhD in Computer Science from the University of California, Los Angeles." https://saturn2016.sched.org/speaker/lorraine_fesq.1uuuhx7u

Milton Friedman graduated from Rutgers University in 1932 with a bachelor degree in Mathematics. Milton Friedman was awarded the 1976 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics "for his achievements in the fields of consumption analysis, monetary history and theory and for his demonstration of the complexity of stabilization policy." The year after, he retired from the University of Chicago to become a senior research fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. In 1988, after joining President Ronald Reagan's Economic Policy Advisory Board, he was awarded the National Medal of Science and the Presidential Medal of Freedom." From https://econwikis-mborg.wikispaces.com/Milton+Friedman

Ross Guberman "is the CEO of Great Forest, a leading sustainability consultancy that specializes in sustainable waste management solutions for Fortune 500 companies and organizations nationwide. Ross really does practice what he preaches, with a hands-on type vegan lifestyle and cycling everywhere he can. Don't be surprised if you spot him digging in the trash for a waste audit. At Great Forest Ross leads a team that specializes in assisting businesses and large commercial building operators in the development and implementation of successful sustainability programs and management systems that are customized for their specific needs. He has only stepped away from his sustainable endeavors once when he joined the Peace Corps as an environmental education volunteer in the Republic of Cape Verde in West Africa. Ross holds a B.A in mathematics from Rutgers University." http://greatforest.com/about/our-staff/

Karla L. Hoffman received "her B.A. in Mathematics from Rutgers University in 1969, and an M.B.A. and Doctor of Science in Operations Research from George Washington University in 1971 and 1975, respectively. She is a Full Professor in the Systems Engineering and Operations Research Department and served as Chair of the department for five years ending in 2001. Previously, she worked as a mathematician in the Operations Department of the Center for Applied Mathematics of the National Institute of Standards and Technology where she served as a consultant to a variety of government agencies. Dr. Hoffman has many publications in the fields of auction theory and optimization as well as a variety of publications detailing her applied work. .... Dr. Hoffman's primary area of research is combinatorial optimization and combinatorial auction design as well software development and testing. She has developed scheduling algorithms for the airline and trucking industries, developed capital budgeting software for the telecommunications industry, and consults to the Federal Communications Commission on combinatorial auction design and software development." From https://masonspeakers.gmu.edu/speakers/

Lawrence P. Horowitz is "a Senior Advisor at Outcome Capital and brings deep corporate and strategic expertise in the medical technology space. He is also a Principal at Doremus Advisory Services where he specializes in providing valuation in support of R&D portfolio analysis and transaction structuring. His past appointments include Principal with HVA which advised private and small cap life sciences companies on their business development transactions, Vice President of Development at C.R. Bard and Senior Director Business Development at American Cyanamid Company (acquired by American Home Products and now part of Pfizer). His academic involvement includes the Rutgers Center for Management Development, Rutgers Business School, and the University of Umea (Sweden) Biotech Incubator where he has taught courses in life-science entrepreneurship and financial analysis of R&D investment. He has an MBA in Finance from Columbia Graduate School of Business, an MS in Industrial Engineering from NYU, and a BA in Mathematics from Rutgers College where he graduated with highest honors as a Henry Rutgers Scholar. He teaches Principles of Finance and Accounting for the Professional Science Master's Program at Rutgers University." http://mbs.rutgers.edu/about/faculty

Jean-Michelet Jean-Michel "was born in Petit-Goave, Haiti where he received his baccalaureat (high school diploma) in 1985. He then received his B.A. in Mathematics from Rutgers University in 1993 and his Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics from Brown University in 2002. His research interests are in the fields of differential equations and dynamical systems." from http://www.princeton.edu/~wmassey/NAM03/. He is now Assistant Professor at South Carolina State University.

Matt Kohut is currently teaching mathematics at A.E. Wright Middle School in Calabasas, California. After graduating with his bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Rutgers University, Matt attended law school at the Rutgers School of Law - Camden. Subsequently, he clerked for the Honorable Joseph F. Lisa, Presiding Judge of the New Jersey Appellate Division, and worked as an attorney for the firm of Feintuch, Porwich and Feintuch. He then decided to return to mathematics through the Math for America fellowship program.

Carl Martin is "a pop, electronic and alternative singer/songwriter who cites George Michael and Natasha Bedingfield as his major influences. At age 17, he returned to the USA, moving to Arizona to complete his high school education. He received a BA in mathematics from Rutgers University in 2012. .... Martin is currently working with 90's Rock Music Icon Anthony Kirzan of the Spin Doctors ....." See http://www.cdbaby.com/Artist/CarlMartin and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ThPXVFXK268&list=PLj6N7pQVWRNCij2WMQmWAHRZkhwxUbUem&index=5"

MaryAnn Millar is "a Board Certified Gynecologist and a Fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. She is Clinical Assistant Professor, Upstate University Hospital. She has a B.A. in Mathematics from Rutgers University and was awarded her M.D. from the State University of New York in Buffalo. Her residency in Ob/Gyn was completed in Syracuse at Upstate University Hospital." From http://drmaryannmillar.com/about.htm

Tom Peters is "a software engineer at Ufora, Inc. He has worked on a multiple aspects of Ufora's auto-parallel, multi-host, open source Python project, Pyfora. He has a PhD in mathematics from Columbia University, where he specialized in low-dimensional topology, using Heegaard Floer homology to compute invariants of manifolds, and has a BA in mathematics from Rutgers University." http://mlconf.com/mlconf-2016-atlanta/

Elizabeth Ricci (VirMedica) is an "accomplished global software executive with a proven track record in engineering, project management and product development, with an emphasis on quality, timeliness and customer success. In her prior engagement as VP of engineering for PHT Corporation, she was responsible for all core products and was instrumental in rolling out the company's next generation technologies. Prior positions include senior VP, products at Kadient, Inc., and senior VP, global products at Authoria, Inc. Elizabeth holds a B.A. in Mathematics from Rutgers University and a M.S. in Mathematics from Northeastern University." From http://virmedica.com/category/press-release/

Stephen Rosen is a "Managing Director at FTI Consulting and is based in New York. He is a member of the Insurance and Pension group in the Forensic and Litigation Consulting segment and heads the Pension practice. ..... Mr. Rosen's work includes the design, implementation, and administration of all forms of qualified employee benefit plans .... Mr. Rosen holds a B.A. in mathematics from Rutgers University. He completed coursework in business administration from the Wharton School of Business and actuarial science from the University of Iowa." from http://www.fticonsulting.com/our-people/stephen-h-rosen.

Timothy Rudderow "co-founded Mount Lucas in 1986 and is the firm's president, overseeing all of its activities. He has been in the investment business since the late 1970s, when he worked at Commodities Corporation with the late Frank Vannerson, another co-founder of Mount Lucas. Tim specializes in the design and management of technical trading systems applied to the futures, equity, and fixed income markets. He holds a B.A. in Mathematics from Rutgers University and an M.B.A. in Management Analysis from Drexel University." https://www.mtlucas.com/OurTeam.aspx?content=BioPrincipals

Jeffrey Rubin is Professor in the Department of Economics at the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research New Brunswick Campus. "His research is focused on health economics including the impact of health insurance on use of care. He also has served on a subcommittee on the Governor's Commission that examined the situation facing hospitals in New Jersey, and has published papers on the costs of mental illness and the economic consequences of spinal cord injury. Rubin received his B.A. in mathematics from Rutgers College and his Ph.D. from Duke University." http://urwebsrv.rutgers.edu/experts/index.php?a=display&f=expert&id=1465.

Larry Sher is "a member of the actuarial consulting team and part of the senior leadership for October Three. Larry also is head of [their] dispute resolution practice, which provides support to clients in disputes related to their retirement plans, both in litigation and otherwise. .... Larry received a B.A. in Mathematics from Rutgers University. He has been a Board Member and Vice-Chair of the Actuarial Standards Board, the group that establishes actuarial standards of practice for all US actuaries. Larry has also been on the Boards of the American Academy of Actuaries and the Conference of Consulting Actuaries, and was recently President of the Conference. Larry has written several articles on cash balance and other defined benefit plan issues and is a frequent speaker at industry and professional seminars." from http://www.octoberthree.com/who-we-are/larry-sher

Robert L. Strawderman, joined Cornell in 2000, and previously a faculty member in the Department of Biostatistics at the University of Michigan. "His major research area is survival analysis, a branch of statistics that deals with characterizing the time until an event, such as the death of an organism or the failure of a machine, occurs. Professor Strawderman's particular research interests lie in the study of events that can recur, such heart attacks or epidemics. He collaborates extensively with subject matter specialists in applying these and other statistical methods to problems in health services, cardiology, epidemiology, demography, and veterinary medicine. Strawderman is on the faculty of two departments at Cornell, Biological Statistics and Computational Biology (BSCB) and Statistical Science..... Strawderman has a BA in Mathematics from Rutgers." https://www.orie.cornell.edu/news/index.cfm?news_id=62175&news_back=category%3D62137

Jeffrey E. Steif Professor and winner of the Eva and Lars Gardings prize in Mathematics. Department of Mathematics Chalmers University of Technology. http://www.chalmers.se/CV/steif.pdf

Michael Yatauro is on the faculty at PSU-Brandywine. He earned "a B.A. in mathematics from Rutgers University, an M.A. in mathematics from the University of Pennsylvania, and a Ph.D. in mathematics from Stevens Institute of Technology. Dr. Yatauro views mathematics as a form of artistic expression and a scientific tool of great utility. His primary research is in the field of graph theory. In particular, he is interested in determining structural aspects of a graph by studying its degree sequence. ...." from http://brandywine.psu.edu/person/michael-yatauro

Tony Trongone joined Pemberton Township Schools as Superintendent [of Schools] in July, 2015. Before coming to Pemberton he served as superintendent of schools for Berlin Borough and Gibbsboro Public Schools, a post he held for five years. His previous experience includes serving as district supervisor of curriculum and instruction for Cherry Hill Public Schools, supervisor of mathematics for Gloucester City School District, and secondary mathematics teacher at Northern Burlington Regional High School in Columbus, NJ. Trongone earned his master's degree in Educational Administration from Wilmington University and his BA in Mathematics from Rutgers University. He prescribes to the theory of high challenge with high support, believing all students can learn and it is the responsibility of educators to support students in reaching their fullest potential. He is committed to providing Pemberton students with a rigorous instructional program and multiple pathways to college and career readiness. He is currently a Trustee for the New Jersey School Board Insurance Group and has served as president-elect of the Association of Mathematics Teachers of New Jersey. His other professional memberships include the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, the National Staff Development Council and the New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association, among others." From http://www.pemberton.k12.nj.us/administration/

Emily Sergel has been included in the inaugural class of winners of the Dissertation Award of the Association for Women in Mathematics. Emily completed her PhD at UC-SD in 2016 and now enjoys an NSF Postdoc at the University of Pennsylvania. She graduated from SAS-Rutgers in 2009.

Selected Alumni/Alumnae of the Graduate Program

Roy Goldman is former Chief Actuary at Humana Inc.  http://press.humana.com/press-release/current-releases/humana-names-roy-goldman-vice-president-and-chief-actuary.

William "Brit" Kirwan is Chancellor Emeritus of the University System of Maryland. He is a nationally recognized authority on critical issues shaping the higher education landscape. Prior to his 13 years as chancellor of the University System of Maryland, Kirwan served as president of Ohio State University, president of the University of Maryland, College Park, and as a member of the University of Maryland faculty. He is a sought-after speaker on a wide range of topics, including access and affordability, cost containment, diversity, innovation, higher education's role in economic development, and academic transformation. Along with his national and international presentations on key issues, he has authored many articles on issues in higher education and has been profiled and cited in academic and mainstream publications. Currently, he chairs the National Research Council Board of Higher Education and Workforce and is past chair of the boards of the Business-Higher Education Forum, the Association of Public and Land Grant Universities (APLU), the American Council for Education (ACE), and the American Association of Colleges and Universities (AAC&U). Among other honors, he is the recipient of the 2009 Carnegie Corporation Academic Leadership Award and the 2010 TIAA Theodore Hesburgh Leadership Excellence Award. He received his Ph.D. in Mathematics from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. From http://agb.org/bios/william-e-kirwan .

Zoltan Szabo is a Professor of mathematics at Princeton University. With Peter Ozsvath he created Heegaard Floer homology, a homology theory for 3-manifolds. For this contribution to the field of topology, Ozsvath and Szabo were awarded the 2007 Oswald Veblen Prize in Geometry. They received Ph.D.'s from Rutgers University in 1994. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Ozsv%C3%A1th and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zolt%C3%A1n_Szab%C3%B3_(mathematician).

Camelia Pop "received her Ph.D. in mathematics from Rutgers University in 2012. She was a Hans Rademacher Instructor in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Pennsylvania from 2012­-15. Her research interests are in partial differential equations and stochastic processes, including applications to population genetics and mathematical finance." From https://cse.umn.edu/r/new-college-of-science-and-engineering-faculty-for-2015-16/.

Emilie Purvine "completed her B.S. in Mathematics from University of Wisconsin, Madison in 2006 and Ph.D. in Mathematics from Rutgers University, New Jersey, in 2011. Emilie then joined PNNL as a Postdoc doing work on semantic knowledge systems and graph theory. She became a permanent staff scientist in November of 2012 and continues to work on graph theory and discrete math applied to cyber security and the power grid. Recently, Emilie has also begun work on applying methods from algebraic topology to information integration and evolution of cyber systems." From http://cybersecurity.pnnl.gov/principalinvestigators.stm.

Noriko Yui is "a professor of mathematics at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. A native of Japan, Yui obtained her B.S. from Tsuda College, and her Ph.D. in Mathematics from Rutgers University in 1974 under the supervision of Richard Bumby. Known internationally, Yui has been a visiting researcher at the Max-Planck-Institute in Bonn a number of times and a Bye-Fellow at Newnham College, University of Cambridge. Her research is based in arithmetic geometry with applications to mathematical physics and notably mirror symmetry. Currently, much of her work is focused upon the modularity of Calabi-Yau threefolds. .... Professor Yui has been the managing editor for the journal "Communications in Number Theory and Mathematical Physics" since its inception in 2007. She has edited a number of monographs, and she has co-authored two books." from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noriko_Yui.

Select Former Faculty of the Rutgers Mathematics Department

Daniel E. Gorenstein (January 1, 1923 to August 26, 1992) was an American mathematician. He earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees at Harvard University, where he earned his Ph.D. in 1950 under Oscar Zariski, introducing in his dissertation a duality principle for plane curves that motivated Grothendieck's introduction of Gorenstein rings. He was a major influence on the classification of finite simple groups. After teaching mathematics to military personnel at Harvard before earning his doctorate, Gorenstein held posts at Clark University and Northeastern University before he began teaching at Rutgers University in 1969, where he remained for the rest of his life. He was the founding director of DIMACS in 1989, and remained as its director until his death. Gorenstein was awarded many honors for his work on finite simple groups. He was recognised, in addition to his own research contributions such as work on signalizer functors, as a leader in directing the classification proof, the largest collaborative piece of pure mathematics ever attempted. In 1972 he was a Guggenheim Fellow and a Fulbright Scholar; in 1978 he gained membership in the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and in 1989 won the Steele Prize for mathematical exposition." from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Gorenstein.

Helmut Hofer is "a German-American mathematician, one of the founders of the area of symplectic topology. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and the recipient of the 1999 Ostrowski Prize and the 2013 Heinz Hopf Prize. Since 2009, he is a faculty member at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He currently works on symplectic geometry, dynamical systems, and partial differential equations. His contributions to the field include Hofer geometry." From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helmut_Hofer

Jane Scanlon "received her doctorate from the University of Michigan in 1949 under the direction of Erich H. Rothe. After two postdoctoral fellowships, from the Office of Naval Research and the University of Michigan, she worked as a mathematician in the Air Force and for the American Optical Company, and as an instructor at Wheaton College and Stonehill College. In 1957, she moved to the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, and in 1965 took a position as professor at Rutgers University. She became professor emeritus in 1991. She was awarded a Visiting Professorship for Women from the National Science Foundation to spend the 1984-1985 year at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences. At the Joint Mathematics Meetings in Boulder in August 1989, she presented the Pi Mu Epsilon J. Sutherland Frame Lecture. Scanlon's research has focused on mathematical biology, singular perturbation theory, and nonlinear analysis. She has published more than fifty papers, two research monographs (Fixed Points and Topological Degree in Nonlinear Analysis and Mathematical Aspects of Hodgkin-Huxley Neural Theory), as well as a textbook (Differential Equations: Introduction and Qualitative Theory)." From http://www.awm-math.org/noetherbrochure/Scanlon85.html

Thomas Spencer is Professor in the School of Mathematics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He "has made major contributions to the theory of phase transitions and the study of singularities at the transition temperature. In special cases, he and his collaborators have proved universality at the transition temperature. Spencer has also worked on partial differential equations with stochastic coefficients, especially localization theory. He is presently developing a mathematical theory of supersymmetric path integrals to study the quantum dynamics of a particle in random media. His other interests include random matrices, chaotic behavior of dynamical systems, and nonequilibrium theories of turbulence." https://www.ias.edu/scholars/spencer.

 

 

Math 151–152 is the introductory year course in the calculus sequence in New Brunswick for majors in the mathematical sciences, the physical sciences, and engineering.

  • The first semester, Math 151 or 153, presents the differential calculus of the elementary functions of a single real variable: the rational, trigonometric and exponential functions and their inverses; various applications via the Mean Value Theorem; and an introduction to the integral calculus.
  • The second semester, Math 152, continues the study of the integral calculus, with applications, and covers the theory of infinite series and power series, touching on differential equations and a few other topics as well.

Transitioning from Math 135 to Math 152:

Students who intend to go directly from Math 135 to Math 152 will need to fill in some gaps through self-study.
The details are in the document: Transferring From 135 to 152

Textbook:

Jon Rogawski & Colin Adams, Calculus, Early Transcendentals, 3rd edition, plus WebAssign

Purchase options:

  • Hardcover custom 3rd edition and WebAssign premium access code (for the duration of the 3rd edition). 
    ISBN 978-1-319-04853-2 
    NJ Books: \(125.00.
  • E-book custom 3rd edition and WebAssign premium access code (for the duration of the 3rd edition) 
    ISBN 978-1-319-04911-9 
    NJ Books: \)107.50

The 3rd edition is purchased with a WebAssign access code which will be used throughout the sequence 151-152-251. The publisher is unable to replace this code if it is lost, so be careful to retain it.(The third edition was introduced beginning in Fall 2015.)

Course Materials


{rucourse course = "01:640:152" semester = "92017"}

Math 151–152 is the introductory year course in the calculus sequence in New Brunswick for majors in the mathematical sciences, the physical sciences, and engineering.

  • The first semester, Math 151 or 153, presents the differential calculus of the elementary functions of a single real variable: the rational, trigonometric and exponential functions and their inverses; various applications via the Mean Value Theorem; and an introduction to the integral calculus.
  • The second semester, Math 152, continues the study of the integral calculus, with applications, and covers the theory of infinite series and power series, touching on differential equations and a few other topics as well.

Transitioning from Math 135 to Math 152:

Students who intend to go directly from Math 135 to Math 152 will need to fill in some gaps through self-study.
The details are in the document: Transferring From 135 to 152

Textbook:

Jon Rogawski & Colin Adams, Calculus, Early Transcendentals, 3rd edition, plus WebAssign

Purchase options:

  • Hardcover custom 3rd edition and WebAssign premium access code (for the duration of the 3rd edition). 
    ISBN 978-1-319-04853-2 
    NJ Books: \(125.00.
  • E-book custom 3rd edition and WebAssign premium access code (for the duration of the 3rd edition) 
    ISBN 978-1-319-04911-9 
    NJ Books: \)107.50

The 3rd edition is purchased with a WebAssign access code which will be used throughout the sequence 151-152-251. The publisher is unable to replace this code if it is lost, so be careful to retain it.(The third edition was introduced beginning in Fall 2015.)

Course Materials

{rucourse course = "01:640:152" semester = "92016"}

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During the first year of graduate studies, students are mainly focused on taking classes, preparing for the written qualifying exam and adjusting to graduate student life at Rutgers.

During the second year students are focused on identifying potential research areas and advisors, and preparing for the oral qualifying exam.

The graduate program mentoring committee consists of faculty members who are each assigned a group of entering students. The assignment of mentors to students is not necessarily based on research interests. Rather the mentor is available to the student to discuss concerns that arise during the first years, and to help the student make contacts with potential research advisors. The graduate program director also serves a general advising role for all students.

The assignment of mentors to students should not bound students to limit their interaction with other faculty members in any way;  we courage students to establish their own informal mentoring relationships with additional faculty. You may find useful information in the handbook How to get the mentoring you want, published by the graduate school of the University of Michigan.

Graduate Faculty research-by-area pages

The Department of Mathematics at Rutgers-New Brunswick is located in the Hill Center* on the Busch Campus of Rutgers University in Piscataway, NJ. (Piscataway is just across the Raritan River from New Brunswick.)

The University page for Hill Center has a map and driving directions. Please click on the map to zoom out.

Also, you can find more specific directions to the Hill Center by going to Google Maps and entering your starting location. Make sure to click "The Hill Center" link on the left hand side and then click "Get directions" and also select "to here" or "from here", depending on what you need. (The reason for doing this is that Google Maps, and other maps sites, does not have the correct location for the Hill Center. Hill Center is across Frelinghuysen Road from the northeast corner of the Rutgers Golf Course. )

*The rigorous definition is as follows: Longitude 74.47168 W, Latitude 40.52180 N.


Our own travel directions are as follows:

BY CAR:

Because of road construction on and near the Busch campus, the driving instructions given below may change. Some information about the current state of construction and detours can be found on the Route 18 Construction Information web page. The University also provides updated directions at University directions.

NOTE: Rutgers University has five campuses in New Brunswick. The Department of Mathematics is located on the Busch Campus. Road signs marked "Rutgers University" may lead to the wrong campus. If you follow signs, those directing you to "Rutgers Stadium" will bring you to Busch Campus, the location of the Mathematics Department.


From the NJ Turnpike: Take Exit 9 and proceed north (west) on New Jersey Route 18. It is recommended that you use either of the two leftmost lanes of Route 18. Follow Route 18 through New Brunswick and across the John A. Lynch Memorial Bridge. (Ignore the "George Street Rutgers University" exit.) Exit Route 18 at Campus Road (the sign also says Rutgers Stadium and Busch Campus). At the traffic circle, turn right onto Bartholmew Road. At the stop sign, turn left onto Brett Road. Follow Brett road until it vanishes in a maze of parking lots. Park in lot 64, 60A, 60B (or at lot 67 near Brett and Bartholomew Roads) and put your parking permit in the front window. If you do not have a permit, please to go the Department Office(Hill 346 or 311) and get a one-day guest permit. Hang the permit on your rearview mirror to avoid ticketing. The Hill Center is the seven story dark brick building, located just behind the CORE building.

From Interstate Highway 287: Take the exit marked "River Road, Bound Brook, Highland Park" (exit 9), following River Road east toward Highland Park. Continue on River Road past Colgate and past the traffic light at Hoes Lane. At the next left turn lane (not the next possible next left turn), turn left onto Sutphen Rd. At the 4 way stop just beyond the stadium, turn left and follow Frelinghuysen Road. At the traffic circle, continue straight onto Bartholomew Road (i.e., ignore the first right turn and do not continue around the circle). At the stop sign, turn left onto Brett Road. Follow Brett road until it vanishes in a maze of parking lots. Park as indicated above.

Note: If you miss the left turn onto Sutphen Rd., you will soon pass under the overpass for Route 18. Make the next left onto Route 18 North. Exit Route 18 at Campus Road (the sign also says Rutgers Stadium and Busch Campus). At the traffic circle, turn right onto Bartholmew Road. At the stop sign, turn left onto Brett Road. Follow Brett road until it vanishes in a maze of parking lots. Park as indicated above.

From Long Island or New York City Airports: Take the Verrazzano Bridge to the Goethals Bridge to the New Jersey Turnpike and proceed as above.

BY BUS:

The Suburban Transit (1-800-222-0492) runs convenient express buses from New York City to New Brunswick. There a few places that they pick up and drop off from. Please check the website to see what is available.

BY TRAIN:

Train service to New Brunswick is provided by Amtrak and NJ Transit. This may require changing trains in Trenton or NY/Penn Station. Amtrak info: 1-800-USA-RAIL; NJ Transit: 1-800-772-2222 from NJ; from out of state: 1-973-762-5100.

Once you reach downtown New Brunswick you can get to the Hill Center by taxi in 10 minutes for approximately \(10.00, or by campus bus FREE, in about 10-20 minutes. Buses leave at 10 minute intervals. To reach a campus bus stop from the New Jersey Transit bus station on Albany Street, walk west on Albany St., then take the first right onto George Street and walk two blocks to the first traffic light. Turn left onto Hamilton Street, walk one block and you will see the campus bus shelter on your right across College Avenue. To reach the bus stop from the train station at Albany and Easton, walk uphill on Easton Ave. and turn right onto Hamilton Street at the second traffic light. Walk one block and you will see the campus bus shelter on your left. Take an "A", or "H" bus marked to Busch Campus and get off at the Hill Center.

How to walk from the New Brunswick Train Station to the Hill Center on the Busch Campus of Rutgers University

BY PLANE:

The nearest airport is Newark Liberty International Airport. If you fly there, you can either

  1. Rent a car.
  2. Take the
    1. Airporter (call 1-800-385-4000 for reservations) to the Hilton Hotel on Route 18, East Brunswick (cost is \)20.00 per person). Schedule of Departure and Arrival times to/from Newark Airport. Then you should take a taxi (about 15 minutes) to the Hill Center, Frelinghuysen Road, Busch Campus, Piscataway, N.J.
    2. State Shuttle to the Hyatt Hotel in New Brunswick. Call 1-800-427-3207 for reservations.
  3. Take the Airtrain Newark directly from the arrivals terminal to the new Rail Link station and then connect with NJ Transit trains to New Brunswick. (cost is \(8.95 to \)10.80).
  4. Take a bus to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York City (every 15 minutes).
  5. Take a taxi (the cost is approximately \(45 plus tolls plus tip).

From Kennedy airport, you can take the Airporter (call 1-800-385-4000 for reservations) to the Hilton Hotel in East Brunswick (it makes an intermediate stop at Newark Airport). The cost is \)38. The cost of a taxi could be as high as $120 plus tolls plus tip.

You should never have to fly via LaGuardia. But if you do, from LaGuardia airport, you can either rent a car or take public transportation to New York City and then on to New Brunswick.

How To Walk from The New Brunswick Train Station To The Hill Center in the Busch Campus of Rutgers University

Last Update: March 28, 2006 [to enter the name of Busch Campus Drive]
Previous Update: June 14, 2005. [To implement the new Busch-College Ave walkway]
First Version: Jan. 14, 2002.

Written By Doron Zeilberger.

Note Added Aug. 2, , 2004: The construction seems to be over, at least for now, and the route below is again passable. [added June 20, 2005: the "route below" refers to the old route, so the above statement is true but unnecessary]

There is a safe way to walk, especially now with the new walkway. The whole way takes me appx. 32 minutes [using the new walkway] or 42 minutes [using the old route via Johnson Drive and the Stadium]. The instructions below also apply to biking, and the times then should be divided by 3.

  1. Go to the end of the platform (away from the station, in the direction of the train if you came from the West (Trenton) and in the opposite direction if you came from the East (NY) ), walk downstairs, make a left onto [ If you came from Trenton/Princeton: George and then immediately another left on] Somerset. Walk a block and make a right on College Ave. On the left-hand side, walk to the end of College Avenue and enter Buccleuch park (about 12 min. walks).

  2. Walk another minute on a path parallel to George St., and a little before the Buccleuch Mansion, make a right that leads to stairs. Walk down the stairs, and carefully cross George St. to the bike path/pedestrian walk on the Lynch bridge.

  3. After about two to three minutes you have a choice: turn left down to Johnson Drive and go the Old Way (see below, that takes 10 minutes longer) OR:

New Way (June 2005):

  1. DONT's turn left (downhill), but go straight and continue on the bridge and follow the path all the way to the end [ 7 additional minutes]. This ends at Busch Campus Drive. Take a left and Walk a few steps to the corner of Busch Campus Drive and Sutphen Road. [the street sign just says "Campus Drive"].
  2. Cross [Busch] Campus Drive at the crosswalk (carefully! the stupid cars go very fast and do not even slow down for you, even though they are supposed to give you the right of way) and make a left. Continte (after a few minutes past a traffic circle) onto Frelinghuysen Rd., and arive at Hill Center (6 minutes).


[OLD WAY: (be careful when you cross River Rd)

  1. Follow that path. It ends at Johnson Drive. (about 5 minutes) Make a right on Johnson Drive.
  2. Keep walking until you hit Landing Lane (3 minutes) after crossing Landing Lane (carefully!) make a right, staying on Landing Lane.
  3. Walk on the shoulder until you hit the light at River Rd. (2 minutes). Push the button for crossing. When the light turns GREEN, Cross carefully (watching the cars that are turning left, it is your right of way, but you still have to be careful, the light is very short and the cars are impatient.)
  4. Now you are at the beginning of a steep uphill path that leads to the Stadium. You hit the Stadium at the Hale Center. (3 minutes)
  5. After you hit the stadium at Hale Center, walk on the sidewalk along the stadium. At the North Entrance, cross Sutphen Road on the crosswalk (carefully!), and make a left (1.5 minutes)
  6. After less than a minute you hit FITCH Rd., make a right on Fitch. On your left you will have a Golf course, and on your right you have first D-field and behind it the Busch Bubble, and later Yurack Field. At Yurack Field, Fitch Rd. continues to the right. Instead of turning right, keep going straight, still with the Golf course to your left, and Yurack Field on the right. You can see Hill Center at the top of the Hill. Walk to the end of that path (it ends at Parking Lot 53A), until you hit Frelinghuysen. Turn left, and after a few seconds cross Frelinghuysen at the crosswalk. (8 minutes)]

Contact Us

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Department of Mathematics

Department of Mathematics
Rutgers University
Hill Center - Busch Campus
110 Frelinghuysen Road
Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019, USA

Phone: +1.848.445.2390
Fax: +1.732.445.5530